Aviation accidents and incidents

August 12, 2013 - 12:45pm

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada will conduct an independent external review of the investigation processes used by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) and publish a report of the results. The review, to begin with an initial visit by the TSB team this month, is intended to provide an independent and objective assessment of the ATSB’s investigation methodology and processes.

August 12, 2013 - 12:05pm

The NTSB will offer a two-day training seminar on October 24-25 about the most effective methods of managing emergency communications following a major aircraft accident or incident.
The training, aimed at aviation communication professionals from airports, airlines, charter and private business jet operators, will take place at the NTSB’s Training Center in Ashburn, Va. (near Washington, D.C.).

August 10, 2013 - 12:00pm

The key topic of aviation safety, which preceded LABACE 2013 with the Bombardier Safety Standdown, will follow it on August 17, as Brazil’s CENIPA has organized a full-day National Symposium on the Prevention of Aeronautic Accidents, for 600 participants from all facets of the aviation community. The event will include simultaneous translation and will take place at the Transamêrica Hotel.

August 3, 2013 - 1:40am

Preliminary Report: King Air Pilot Escapes Road Landing

Beechcraft King Air 200, Chicago Executive Airport (KPWK), Ill., June 26, 2013–The sole-occupant pilot of a King Air 200 was not injured when the aircraft landed on a four-lane highway short of the approach end of Runway 16 at KPWK. The King Air narrowly missed striking apartment buildings, and no one on the ground was injured. The aircraft was substantially damaged when the right wing struck a tree. There was no fire.

August 3, 2013 - 12:35am
Dense, continuous smoke in the cockpit is a rare occurrence.

Responding to a mandate from Congress to study the FAA’s oversight of cockpit smoke mitigation, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) has found that dense, continuous smoke occurs so infrequently that it was not practical for the GAO to reach a conclusion about the effectiveness of the FAA’s actions.

According to the watchdog agency, the NTSB and the FAA identified no accidents or incidents between 2002 and 2012 involving dense, continuous smoke in the cockpit.

August 3, 2013 - 12:15am
AIN tables show “incidents” as well as “accidents” because the FAA and NTSB draw fine distinctions between the two events. Click to enlarge.

The U.S. business jet fleet worldwide recorded significantly fewer nonfatal accidents and fatalities in the first six months of this year compared with the same period last year. According to figures compiled by AIN, N-numbered business jets incurred seven accidents in the first half of this year versus 22 during the same time last year.

August 1, 2013 - 2:20am

The FAA has issued a final rule that raises to 1,500 the minimum flight hours required by first officers for U.S. air carriers flying under Part 121 regulations, up from the current 250 hours. The new rules stem from a Congressional mandate following the 2009 crash of Colgan Air 3407, a Bombardier Q400, in Buffalo, NY. The rule also requires that first officers hold an ATP certificate and a type rating in the aircraft being flown.

July 22, 2013 - 12:35pm

A June forum organized by the Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) and Eurocontrol looked at why pilots of transport-category aircraft regularly try to salvage unstable approaches when a go-around could significantly reduce aircraft accidents. The subject for discussion was to prove extremely topical in the light of the Asiana Airlines 214 accident in San Francisco on July 6. Initial investigations have indicated that a go-around might have prevented the fatal crash.

July 22, 2013 - 12:30pm

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration said on Friday it plans to order inspections of the wiring associated with the emergency locator transmitters (ELTs) on Boeing 787s following a recommendation from the UK’s Air Accidents Investigation Branch that operators disable the airplanes’ Honeywell-made systems. An Advisory Directive scheduled for publication today would require inspection for proper wire routing and damaged or pinched wires, the statement said. Operators would also need to inspect the transmitter’s battery compartment for condensation or overheating.

July 22, 2013 - 12:15pm

The July 12 fire aboard an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 787 at London Heathrow Airport (ELHR) has prompted the UK Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) to recommend operators turn off Honeywell’s Rescu 406 AFN emergency locator transmitters (ELTs) aboard the Dreamliner until appropriate airworthiness actions can be completed.

 
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