Battery

February 20, 2013 - 12:25pm

Duncan Aviation is authorized to modify the Universal Avionics UNS-1C flight management system to include an extended-life battery. A Duncan Aviation tech rep told AIN, “The original battery voltage was 3.6 volts and the new one is 3.93 volts. While the voltage increase in this lithium watch-type battery seems small, it makes a big difference. Previously a battery warning meant a day or two at most until you had a databus failure locking up the entire system. The new battery gives you about three months [after a warning],” he said.

February 15, 2013 - 9:44am

Airbus has decided against using a lithium-ion main ship battery for the A350 XWB following the findings by the U.S. National Transportation Board of short-circuiting and “thermal runaway” in the APU battery that caught fire on January 7 in a Japa

February 11, 2013 - 11:20am

In a February 7 news conference, NTSB chairman Deborah Hersman explained the latest findings on the battery problem that resulted in the grounding of the Boeing 787 fleet three weeks ago.

February 7, 2013 - 1:06pm

The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board has determined that several assumptions used in the Federal Aviation Administration’s application of nine special conditions in the certification of the lithium-ion battery system on the Boeing 787 proved incorrect, NTSB chairman Deborah Hersmann revealed Thursday during a media briefing at the board’s headquarters in Washington,

February 5, 2013 - 3:40pm

EaglePicher Technologies expects to certify a lithium-ion main-ship aircraft battery by year-end, according to Ron Nowlin, vice president and general manager of EaglePicher Aerospace Systems. The battery has been selected for a jet, but Nowlin was unable to reveal the OEM and said he “cannot confirm” news reports “that we are doing any work for Cessna.”

February 4, 2013 - 1:35pm
NTSB investigator Joseph Panagiotou uses a stereo microscope to examine a battery cell from the JAL Boeing 787 that caught fire on January 7. (Photo: NTSB)

As U.S. National Transportation Safety Board investigators continued their painstaking examination of the lithium-ion battery that caught fire on February 7 in a Japan Airlines Boeing 787, the airplane’s manufacturer projected a business-as-usual posture during its fourth-quarter earnings call last Wednesday.

February 4, 2013 - 3:10am

For those who have tried to balance a piece of luggage the size of a Prius on the bathroom scale before heading off to the airport, there’s a solution from Tool Testing Lab: the GripScale.

According to the company the scale is ideal for the business aviation industry, where weight-and-balance calculations are sometimes critical and not easily calculated. Tool Testing has certified the digital scale to NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) requirements and is an aviation distributor for the item’s manufacturer, eBags of Denver.

February 1, 2013 - 7:01am
Lithium-ion laptop battery

The subject of fires caused by lithium-ion batteries took on urgent new meaning following two thermal runaway incidents with lithium-ion batteries installed in Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner. A lot of information—and misinformation—surrounds lithium-ion technology, and experts from all over are weighing in with their opinions.

January 29, 2013 - 4:10pm

The Cessna Citation CJ4 is currently the only business jet certified with (but no longer flying with) a lithium-ion main-ship battery, using lithium-iron phosphate, not the lithium-cobalt oxide battery found on the Boeing 787, which is currently grounded in the wake of battery fires.

January 28, 2013 - 12:16pm

Investigations of separate incidents involving Boeing 787s in the U.S. and Japan appear to concur that the batteries that burned in each case did not overcharge. But investigators continue to seek causes for the two incidents that led to the grounding of the worldwide 787 fleet. The probes remain focused on the eight-cell lithium-ion batteries manufactured by Japan’s GS Yuasa for Thales, which supplies the 787’s electrical power conversion system.

 
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