Unmanned aerial vehicle

July 15, 2014 - 3:00am

The U.S. Army’s 1-229th Attack Reconnaissance Battalion (ARB), based at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state, has fielded the latest model Boeing AH-64E Apache Guardian attack helicopter in Afghanistan with impressive results, Army and Boeing officials said. The deployment has also afforded the “Tigersharks” an opportunity to direct unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) using the AH-64E’s UAS tactical datalink.

July 15, 2014 - 12:45am

Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) is introducing new helicopter safety technology that allows flight in degraded visual environments. The program is an example of how the group is diversifying its activities to achieve a more balanced portfolio between civil and defense markets. Another example is its new TaxiBot system for more fuel-efficient airliner taxiing, which has just completed certification testing at Germany’s Frankfurt International Airport.

July 15, 2014 - 12:15am

With its unmanned air vehicles having achieved more than 1.2 million operational flight hours and serving with more than 50 operators, IAI is one of the leading companies involved in this sector. Here at Farnborough International 2014 it is promoting a wide range of its UAVs, from the 10,230-pound Heron TP to the nine-pound vertical takeoff Ghost, along with related technologies such as advanced electro-optical, sigint (signals intelligence) and maritime patrol payloads.

July 15, 2014 - 12:10am

If you build it, they will come. The UK National Aeronautical Centre (Hall 1 Stand C9) has answered the first part of that challenge by making available the facilities to fly large unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) beyond a pilot’s visual line of sight, in an environment that also accommodates manned aviation. The center now awaits a response from what is expected to be a boom market for commercial UAS.

July 15, 2014 - 12:05am

The International Consortium of Aeronautical Test Sites (ICATS) welcomed CATUAV Tech Center (CTC) in Barcelona as its fifth member here at the Farnborough International Airshow yesterday, adding Spain to the list of countries involved in the partnership. The other countries represented in the group include Canada, the U.S., the UK and France.

July 14, 2014 - 7:45am
The Reaper can be armed with four Hellfire missiles and two GBU-12 laser-guided 250-pound bombs. The RAF usually flies with all four missiles, but only one bomb. The UAV’s Raytheon MTS-B sensor ball and laser rangefinder/designator is beneath the nose, with the satcom antenna above.

In response to increased scrutiny of armed UAV operations by human rights groups, British legislators and the United Nations, the British Ministry of Defence (UK MoD) has stepped up efforts to reassure the public. Late last year, it allowed media (including AIN) access to the Royal Air Force Reaper ground control station (GCS) at RAF Waddington for the first time. New documents describing UK operational procedures, including targeting, have been released. The UK is one of only three countries to have fired weapons from UAVs in combat, the others being Israel and the U.S.

July 13, 2014 - 8:00am
TAI’s Hurkus, a tandem two-seat, low-wing, single-engine turboprop (left), is being developed as a basic trainer and ground attack aircraft for the Turkish armed forces. The prototype Hurkus, TU-VCH, made its first flight on Aug. 29, 2013, a year after it was rolled out at TAI’s Ankara facility.

Turkish Aerospace Industries (TAI) is showcasing its T129 ATK attack helicopter and its Anka Male UAV here at Farnborough International Airshow for the first time. The burgeoning aerospace giant needs to find export customers soon if TAI is to go some way toward self-sufficiency. It is no surprise then that marketing efforts of the T129 ATAK (tactical reconnaissance and attack helicopter) have been stepped up this year, with the company also displaying it at the Bahrain International Airshow in January and ILA Berlin in May.

July 12, 2014 - 8:00am
Britain’s regulatory framework allows it to have a more active small-RPAS sector than many other countries. Here, a British Army RPAS Watchkeeper is in the system and cleared to fly, but there are no civilian RPASs in its class–that is, weighing more than 150 kg–operating in the UK.

Integrating remotely piloted air systems (RPAS) into civilian airspace in Europe is not going to be easy. Official programs are many, work is extensive, detailed and ongoing, but anyone expecting an early resolution is going to be disappointed. This was the picture gleaned from a series of presentations at last month’s RPAS Today: Opportunities and Challenges conference, run by the Royal Aeronautical Society in London.

July 12, 2014 - 7:00am

The European agency tasked with keeping watch over the EU’s external borders, Frontex, is enthusiastic about adopting remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) to help them in that job. But significant challenges–some technical but the majority legal–mean that unmanned aircraft are unlikely to be deployed to help defend EU borders in the near future.

July 12, 2014 - 6:00am
Israeli-built Heron 1 UAVs have been operated for the German air force over Afghanistan via a lease-operate-maintain contract.

The Heron 1 UAVs that have been providing imagery for the German air force (GAF) over Afghanistan have now clocked more than 18,500 hours in four years. The lease-operate-maintain contract has already been extended twice, and will likely be extended for a further six months, as the German ponders its long-term UAS policy.

 
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