Turbines

June 6, 2014 - 5:08pm

The engine failure that occurred during ground testing of the first Bombardier CSeries flight test airplane on May 29 originated in the low-pressure turbine, according to the airframe maker.

October 22, 2013 - 6:15am
Big Ass Fans has found a niche in the aviation market, where its fans are used to circulate and cool air in hangars. Some of the models can be equipped with security cameras, fire-suppression equipment and LED lights. The company’s booth at the show is being cooled by an 18-foot ceiling fan.

The firm started in 1999 as the HVLS Fan Co., an acronym for high-volume low-speed fans. That name accurately described the design and efficiency of the company’s products, but after three years in business, according to the Lexington, Ky.-based manufacturer, “we finally had to bow to the sentiments of our customers and concede that we do, in fact, design and manufacture some Big Ass Fans.” Hence, the current brand name.

October 19, 2013 - 1:40am
A Dallas Airmotive field service tech inspects a PW500 engine.

Dallas Airmotive unveiled its new logo here at NBAA 2013. Using the company’s traditional red and blue colors, the new logo morphs spinning turbine engine blades into the shape of a Phoenix.

December 4, 2012 - 2:05am

Pascal Chrétien, the designer and pilot of an electric rotorcraft that flew in 2011, is forming a company that aims to offer hybrid power for aircraft, notably helicopters. The patented technology is called Tetraero, and according to its promoters its main benefit would be in safety.

October 2, 2009 - 11:21am

Dassault Falcon 900B, Gatwick, UK, Jan. 20, 2007–The UK’s Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) has ruled the probable cause of the uncontained engine failure was the fracturing of a stage-two low-pressure (LP) turbine blade due to a casting defect, with the possibility that this was caused by a third-stage blade failure.

January 30, 2007 - 5:04am

The list of events that must be reported to the NTSB will grow if the agency adopts proposed changes to NTSB Part 830.

October 16, 2006 - 12:04pm

I have been following some of the discussion about the February flight of a British Airways 747-400 from Los Angeles to London after one of the airplane’s engines failed on takeoff. In addition to statements from the FAA, much has been written about this event, both in the aviation press and on the Internet, particularly among pilots and the academic community.

 
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