Stall

July 27, 2014 - 1:00pm
SafeFlight AoA sensor

Safe Flight invented the stall warning horn in 1946, and refined the concept with its “lift transducer” beginning in 1953. Now the company is at EAA AirVenture 2014 with a new product–the SCx Leading Edge AoA (angle of attack) indicator. It’s priced to be competitive with other AoA indicators, especially considering its $200 show discount. AirVenture buyers will pay $1,295 when they buy a system at the Safe Flight booth (No. 18). The regular price is still-attractive at $1,495.

July 21, 2014 - 1:50pm

The pilot of an MBB-Kawasaki (Eurocopter) BK117B2 flying a trauma recovery mission at 5,000 feet agl in South Australia last year saw a number of hydraulic fluctuations on the helicopter’s system indicators just before the aircraft experienced an uncommanded and violent pitch up. That excursion was followed closely by a left roll and descent, according to the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB).

July 14, 2014 - 1:43pm

The Dutch government’s safety board wants to publicize the existence of false glideslope indications that could cause the aircraft, when coupled to the autopilot, to pitch up rather than down. The insights were gathered during an investigation into a pitch-up incident on a Boeing 737 in which the incident “digressed” until the aircraft’s stick shaker activated.

The board wants pilots to understand the dangerous information these false glideslope signals can send to an aircraft’s autopilot that might cause the system to operate in a manner opposite to what the cockpit crew expects.

June 2, 2014 - 4:45pm

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada’s final report on the 2012 crash of a Cessna 208B Caravan concluded the stall-induced accident was the result of the pilot’s decision to depart Snow Lake, Manitoba, with the aircraft weighing 600 pounds more than its maximum allowable gross weight and with ice clinging to the wing and tail surfaces. The Cessna Caravan, operated by Gogal Air Services, left Snow Lake on Nov.

May 20, 2014 - 3:50am

Safe Flight Instrument (Booth 5251) introduced at EBACE 2014 its new Icing Conditions Detector (ICD). The patented optical ICD provides an alert that icing conditions exist before ice can accrete on the aircraft. Comprised of a single line replaceable unit, the system is ideal for operations in all modes of flight, according to Safe Flight.

May 3, 2014 - 12:55am

Aviation Performance Solutions has convinced operators of the value of upset prevention and recovery training (UPRT). The Mesa, Ariz.-based company has expanded its customer base rapidly even during the economic slump and is now pushing to take its message around the world.

As APS founder Paul “BJ” Ransbury told AIN, professional pilots “walk away from [our training] with dramatically increased chances to prevent an accident.”

April 2, 2014 - 3:47pm
Asiana Boeing 777-200ER at SFO

While Asiana Airlines acknowledged the culpability of its pilots in the loss of airspeed that ultimately caused the July 6 crash of one of the carrier’s Boeing 777-200ERs on approach to San Francisco International Airport, it also blamed the design of the airplane itself, describing as “inadequate” the warning system to alert the flight crew that the autothrottle had stopped maintaining airspeed.

March 17, 2014 - 10:20am

The FAA released two proposed advisory circulars last week–AC 120-UPRT and AC 120-109A–to establish new guidelines for pilot upset training. These draft rules were developed as part of the qualification, service and use of crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers final rule published on November 12 last year.

March 13, 2014 - 12:01pm
GI 205 standalone indicator

Garmin today announced a new angle-of-attack (AOA) indicator system and a new radar altimeter for general aviation aircraft installations. The GI 260 AOA price starts at $1,499 and offers aircraft owners a way to take advantage of the FAA’s new effort to encourage adoption of AOA systems by making installations less costly. The new $6,995 GRA 55 radar altimeter can help helicopter operators meet the requirements of new FAA Part 135 regulations that mandate such equipment for helicopter emergency medical services operators and other operations.

March 5, 2014 - 1:05am

In recognition of the benefits of angle-of-attack (AOA) indicating systems, the FAA has revised its policies to allow simpler certification and installation approval for the devices. This applies only to aircraft in which an AOA system is not required, according to the FAA memorandum that outlined the change. “Preventing loss of control in general aviation (GA) is a top focus area of the FAA and the GA community.

 
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