Radar

August 9, 2013 - 11:25am

Lockheed Martin selected the Northrop Grumman scalable agile beam radar (SABR) for planned radar upgrades of approximately 445 U.S. and Taiwanese air force F-16s. Northrop Grumman announced the selection on July 31.

August 9, 2013 - 10:25am

American defense contractors are set to enjoy revenues of nearly $4.7 billion from Iraq, according to a series of arms sales notifications by the Pentagon to Congress in the past two weeks. The potential sales include an integrated air defense system worth $2.4 billion and 30 Bell 412EP helicopters worth $300 million. The deals include training and support.

August 7, 2013 - 11:40am

Edward Dolanski has been named president and CEO of Aviall. Dolanski joined Aviall in 2007 as senior vice president of operations. He was promoted to executive v-p and COO in January 2010, and in this role he was responsible for Aviall’s day-to-day business, including operations, information technology and sales.

July 12, 2013 - 10:05am

Raytheon won a hard-fought contest to develop the U.S. Navy’s future airborne electronic warfare system, the Next Generation Jammer (NGJ). On July 8, the Naval Air Systems Command (Navair) said that it had awarded Raytheon a $279.4 million contract for the NGJ technology development (TD) phase.

June 20, 2013 - 7:20am

Airbus has chosen the ACSS T3CAS traffic management computer as the standard surveillance avionics suite for the Airbus single-aisle narrowbody family of aircraft (A318, A319, A320 and A321). T3CAS combines–in a single LRU–key surveillance avionics, including traffic alert and collision avoidance system (Tcas), terrain awareness warning system (Taws), Mode S transponder with automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) OUT and also ADS-B IN functions (airborne traffic situation awareness). T3CAS is also available on the A330, according to ACSS (Chalet A306).

June 19, 2013 - 9:30am

On display in the Thales pavilion, the AESA (active electronically scanned array) version of the RBE2 radar will soon become the first of its kind to go operational in Europe. The first French air force Rafale squadron to convert to the new fighter will receive four AESA-equipped aircraft in October. The first production radar was delivered last October and is completing operational testing at Mont de Marsan airbase.

June 18, 2013 - 10:20am
Display screen of SafeRoute-ITP (In-Trail Procedures)

L-3 Aviation Products announced that it has established a presence in India and that AgustaWestland has selected L-3’s Trilogy electronic standby instrument for new production A119 helicopters.

In February, L-3 (Chalet A306, Static E170) had announced plans to add “technical support for its customers, engineering oversight for programs and expanded business development coverage” at the India Air Show in February. “The local presence advances L-3’s long-term business growth in the emerging Indian aerospace sector, as well as the region,” according to L-3.

June 18, 2013 - 7:15am
AWARE

Raytheon has developed a range of products under the Aware (advanced warfighter awareness for real-time engagement) label that provide enhanced situational awareness and intuitive networking for both aircrew and soldiers on the ground. Some of the capabilities are on display here in Raytheon’s pavilion, where key elements of an F-16 cockpit upgrade are on show, linked with a new proof-of-concept demonstrator of a system that could significantly aid JTACs (joint tactical air controllers) working in the field.

June 18, 2013 - 6:45am
Selex ES

Recently reorganized Selex ES has come to Paris to show off its varied capabilities in the defense and security electronics sector as part of the wider Finmeccanica presence. Selex ES (Chalet A232) is highlighting its ISR, radar and defensive systems, which range in size from unmanned air vehicles to compact sensors.

June 17, 2013 - 3:10am
A single passive radar system detecting reflections from FM, DAB and DVB-T transmissions can be carried in one mobile van, including displays and operator seating. The mast retracts to stow above and behind the vehicle, and all other external parts can be stowed inside when the vehicle is on the move.

When Serbia shot down U.S. Air Force F-117 during the Kosovo war in 1999, skeptics of stealth claimed vindication. However, that success was due to a combination of poor mission planning, smart air-defense operators exploiting both radar and ELINT sensors, some vulnerability in the first-generation platform–and pure luck. Low-observable technology has moved on, and the F-22, F-35 and the latest UCAVs are stealthier than the F-117.

 
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