Pilot report

January 31, 2007 - 9:25am

CESSNA 208, PARKS, ARIZ., NOV. 8, 2002–At approximately 10:20 a.m. (MST) a Cessna 208B (N514DB), operated by Brown County Financial Services, LLC, of Snyder, Texas, was destroyed when it crashed approximately three miles south of Parks, Ariz., about 16 nm northwest of Flagstaff. The commercial pilot, a private-pilot-rated passenger and two other passengers were killed.

January 24, 2007 - 6:40am

The pilot flying a Cessna Caravan that crashed after takeoff on Oct. 6, 2005, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, violated operational requirements, according to the Canadian Transportation Safety Board’s final report. Among the violations were taking off at a weight greater than the legal maximum takeoff weight and exceeding the time allowed between wing contamination inspection and takeoff.

January 10, 2007 - 5:43am

Canada’s Transportation Safety Board has made recommendations in line with the growing concern from the FAA and NTSB about the safety of Cessna 208 Caravans in icing conditions.

December 7, 2006 - 4:31am

Aiming to improve turbulence detection

November 28, 2006 - 12:36pm

Visitors to Universal Weather & Aviation (Booth No. 1020) can learn of the company’s recently launched In-flight Alerts system designed to keep flight crews apprised of weather hazards or other changing conditions that could affect planned and active flight routes. By means of significant system enhancements, Universal now provides automated alerts of new weather or flight-impacting notifications to one of its 60 staff meteorologists.

October 24, 2006 - 10:45am

Mitsubishi MU-2, Parker, Colo., Aug. 4, 2005– The commercial pilot, the sole occupant of he airplane, was killed when MU-2 N454MA crashed on approach to Centennial Airport (APA), near Denver, at 2:06 a.m. The Flight Line cargo airplane had departed from Salt Lake City International Airport at 12:40 p.m. in night IMC.

October 18, 2006 - 6:00am

Pulling into position for takeoff or passing the final approach fix for landing, especially at a mountain airport, presents many challenges. The accident history of corporate jets indicates an apparent lack of preparation for contingencies, such as engine failure on takeoff, mountain wave turbulence, extreme cold temperature errors in altimeters, technology glitches, changes in IFR clearance and so on.

October 10, 2006 - 10:03am

Cessna 441 Conquest, Vestavia Hills, Ala., Dec. 10, 2003–On an IFR flight from Birmingham, Ala., to Venice, Fla., Conquest N441W reached 6,300 feet in its climb to 10,000 feet when it began to lose altitude and deviate from course. Declaring a Mayday, the pilot reported the airplane was in a spin. Several witnesses near the accident site reported seeing the airplane descend from the clouds in a nose-down spiral.

October 2, 2006 - 3:01pm

Mitsubishi MU-2B-36, Pittsfield, Mass., March 25, 2004–The NTSB determined the cause of the accident was “the pilot’s loss of aircraft control for undetermined reasons, which resulted in an inadvertent stall/spin and subsequent impact with the ground.”

September 22, 2006 - 5:04am

Bell 206L LongRanger, Chesterfield, Ind., Feb. 2, 2006–The EMS LongRanger, operated by Petroleum Helicopters (PHI) of Lafayette, La., was destroyed when it hit trees, wires and houses while maneuvering in IMC near Chesterfield. It was en route to pick up a patient at a Kokomo, Ind. hospital. The pilot, flight nurse and paramedic were seriously injured.

 
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