Oxygen mask

August 1, 2013 - 12:50pm

There is a new way for pilots to get the oxygen needed for high-altitude unpressurized flying, Zodiac Aerospace’s Infiniox onboard oxygen-generation system (Obogs), and visitors to EAA AirVenture Oshkosh can see the system installed in a Cessna 206. This is the first time that Zodiac has displayed the Obogs installed in an airplane, and the 206 is parked at Zodiac’s exhibit (127) near Hangar D. Zodiac is also demonstrating its General aviation crew mask oxygen mask, also targeting the unpressurized single- and twin-engine market.

May 6, 2013 - 2:12pm

An investigation by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau concluded that good planning and quick crew reactions were responsible for the lack of injuries and significant damage after failure of the windshield of an Australian-registered Citation X on January 15.

April 5, 2011 - 6:02am

The FAA is abdicating its safety responsibility.

January 26, 2010 - 5:06am

More than 60 percent of business jet pilots do not use oxygen masks when required to by FAA regulations, according to a survey conducted by corporate pilot Chris Shaver for his master’s thesis at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

May 22, 2008 - 7:12am

The Falcon 50, 900 and 900EX are among the first of several business jets to be the subject of a final AD as a result of the FAA’s special certification review (SCR) of all pressurized airplanes after the October 1999 Payne Stewart Learjet 35 crash and several other incidents and accidents attributed to suspected oxygen deprivation.

May 16, 2008 - 11:30am

An Australian coroner inquiry into the death of the pilot and seven passengers on board a King Air 200 that crashed in September 2000 has adjourned the hearing until July to gather further evidence. The aircraft had departed for a 300-nm trip to Leonora, a small mining town northeast of Perth, where it was based.

April 23, 2008 - 6:44am

Gulfstream 100s, Astra SPXs and 1125 Westwinds are the latest business jet models to be the subject of an AD as a result of the FAA’s special certification review (SCR) of all pressurized airplanes after the October 1999 Payne Stewart Learjet 35 crash and several other incidents and accidents attributed to suspected oxygen deprivation.

April 16, 2008 - 9:27am

For aviators and their passengers, oxygen means life at the high altitudes traversed by modern aircraft. True high-altitude passenger flight wasn’t really practicable until large-cabin pressurization was introduced during the halcyon days of aeronautical development surrounding World War II, most notably aboard the Boeing 307 Stratoliner and Lockheed Constellation transports and Boeing B-29 bomber.

August 30, 2007 - 6:32am

The good news about the proliferation of new high-altitude airplanes–turbocharged piston or turbine–is that they offer users the chance to experience the increased efficiency of an engine that likes flying where the air is thin.

November 7, 2006 - 9:40am

Traditionally, the term “safety standdown” refers to a temporary halt to military operations following a string of accidents. It is an opportunity to stop the frenetic pace of normal operations, take stock of what is and isn’t being done correctly and approach renewed operations with a greater degree of care and preparedness.

 
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