Nutrition

December 12, 2013 - 3:09pm

The Civil Aviation Medical Association (CAMA), a group that represents aviation medical examiners (AMEs) in the U.S., is opposing the FAA’s newly proposed policy “that would task AMEs to determine body mass index (BMI) on all pilot applicants.” A BMI exceeding a set value–initially 40–would require evaluation by a board-certified sleep specialist to determine if the pilot applicant has obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

November 25, 2013 - 2:20pm

The U.S. federal air surgeon, Dr. Fred Tilton, plans to demand specific sleep apnea testing for airmen who fit a particular profile. Untreated sleep apnea can be disqualifying to anyone with an FAA-issued medical certificate.

November 21, 2013 - 3:08pm

AOPA sent a letter yesterday to FAA Administrator Michael Huerta, insisting that the agency withdraw its new policy on obstructive sleep apnea or, alternatively, go through the formal rulemaking process.

September 30, 2008 - 10:08am

MedAire physicians are administering up to 600 cholesterol tests at Booth No. 1075 throughout the show. The tests take five minutes to process and are free to NBAA Convention attendees.

May 23, 2008 - 5:02am

Writing in the spring 2000 issue of the FAA’s Federal Air Surgeon’s Medical Bulletin, Rogers Shaw, team coordinator of the FAA’s Civil Aerospace Medical Institute’s aeromedical education division’s airman education program, offered these tips for heading off the dangers of dehydration:

• Drink cool (40 deg F) water (forget the old theory that lukewarm water is absorbed more quickly into the system).

May 23, 2008 - 5:01am

The next time you fly, soak a terrycloth hand towel so that it’s dripping wet and hang it up on the flight deck. Then fly a leg that’s at least an hour-and-a-half long. At the end of that time, the towel will be bone dry, the water absorbed by the ultra-low humidity of the cockpit and cabin environment.

October 9, 2007 - 12:47pm

Doctors and pilots. Hard to find a group more at odds. Doctors, in the person of aviation medical examiners (AMEs), put aviators holding Class I medical certificates through thorough examinations every six months. Aviators view these exams as one of the stiff prices they pay for the privilege of flying for pay.

 
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