Metalworking

December 4, 2013 - 1:55pm

The FAA has issued an Unapproved Parts Notification for MacLean Sky aircraft bolts used in certain Dynafocal mounting assembly low-profile kits that were manufactured without the benefit of an FAA production approval. According to the FAA, from 2009 to 2012 MacLean Sky, formerly Sky-Manufacturing of Commerce, Calif., was manufacturing parts for an FAA production approval holder (PAH) and selling the excess parts to Fasteners Dimensions of Ozone Park, N.Y.

November 17, 2013 - 8:00am

U.S.-based AkzoNobel Aerospace Coatings, a division of International Paints, has reported qualification of one of its base-coat products to the Aerospace Material Specification (AMS) standard, which governs the use of metals for aircraft manufacture and MRO.

October 20, 2013 - 12:30am
Solid Concepts is making aerospace components, [including this FAA-approved air duct for a DC-10,] using the 3-D printing technique.

Solid Concepts has produced multiple 3-D printed components for aerospace applications that it is highlighting at NBAA 2013 (Booth No. N2011).

The company, based in Valencia, Calif., provides rapid prototyping, digital manufacturing, tooling and injection molding to the aerospace, automotive, industrial design and medical industries. It has more than two decades of experience in 3-D printing, or additive manufacturing technologies, producing parts from prototypes to production components by accurately “printing” layers of material until a 3-D form is created.

May 13, 2013 - 2:05pm

The FAA adopted an airworthiness directive for Eurocopter Deutschland MBB-Kawasaki BK117C2 helicopters requiring inspection of the long tail-rotor drive shaft assembly for blind rivets. If any blind rivets are located, the shaft assembly must be replaced. The AD was prompted by the discovery that some helicopters have blind rivets installed in place of solid rivets, which could lead to failure of the tail rotor drive shaft and subsequent loss of control of the helicopter.

July 10, 2012 - 10:20am

EADS Innovation Works is here at the show with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) that was built using a rapid-prototyping method known as additive layer manufacturing (ALM), or 3-D printing. EADS is exhibiting it to demonstrate the possibilities ALM offers. The plastic-material drone here can’t fly, but EADS plans to manufacture a metal one that will be able to fly.

July 9, 2012 - 5:45pm

EADS Innovation Works is here at the show with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) that was built using a rapid-prototyping method known as additive layer manufacturing (ALM), or 3-D printing. EADS is exhibiting it to demonstrate the possibilities ALM offers. The plastic-material drone here can’t fly, but EADS plans to manufacture a metal one that will be able to fly.

November 23, 2011 - 11:57am

JetFlite International’s (JFI) Long Beach, Calif. facility has launched an aircraft refinishment program that repairs and refinishes existent components and materials with minimal replacing.

May 23, 2011 - 11:25am
GKN’s technology team is advancing in methods for combining composites and me...

Not so long ago, the ascent of composites in aerostructures manufacturing seemed an unstoppable progression that could only happen at the expense of metals. Fresh thinking at progressive companies like GKN Aerospace is changing that thinking, with engineers increasingly coming to the conclusion that the two families of materials can coexist in cooperative harmony to give manufacturers the best of both worlds.

May 2, 2011 - 5:42am
Microscope examination revealed fatigue cracks emanating from at least 42 of ...

Misshapen and misaligned rivet holes in parts of the fuselage removed from a Southwest Airlines 737-300 has lent more credence to theories that a manufacturing flaw led to the eventual failure of the lap joint during an April 1 accident in which a five-foot-long tear developed in the roof of the airplane while en route from Phoenix to Sacramento. A rapid depressurization occurred at 34,000 feet, forcing the crew to divert to Yuma, Ariz.

February 16, 2011 - 10:00am

A ceramic core facility is under construction in Tampa and slated to be operational by the first quarter of 2012. Chromalloyís new $5 million, 40,000-sq-ft facility will be built adjacent to its two-month-old, $30 million, 150,000-sq-ft industrial investment foundry. It will allow the company to pour up to one million pounds of superalloy turbine components and parts for aerospace, aero-derivative and industrial gas turbine engines.

 
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