Malaysia Airlines fleet

July 8, 2012 - 7:00am

Boeing Commercial Airplanes is looking forward to continuing industry resilience, with its latest current market outlook (CMO) projecting a $4.5 trillion market for 34,000 new airplanes, for delivery 2012-31. This compares with a predicted 20-year requirement for just fewer than 24,000 units it forecast in 2002.

February 3, 2012 - 1:40am
Gore Design Completions hangar

With growing demand for large executive aircraft from Airbus and Boeing, cabin completion and refurbishment centers specializing in bizliners are finding plenty of work to feather their own nests, and there’s more to come.

November 21, 2011 - 10:50am
Airbus A350XWB has been ordered by Kuwait's Alafco leasing group

Boeing and Airbus are in broad agreement over the impressive growth rate expected in the Middle East airliner fleet between now and 2030, according to new market forecasts released during the Dubai Air Show last week.

November 14, 2009 - 12:44am

Airbus’s new A330-200F freighter flew for the first time early this month, officially marking the start of a 180-hour flight-test and certification campaign with a four-hour test mission over Toulouse, France.

This milestone flight conforms to a schedule that calls for type certification in March and first delivery of the first production example to launch operator, Etihad Crystal Cargo, next summer.

May 6, 2008 - 4:14am

Boeing’s number-crunchers published their long-awaited new commercial market outlook at the Farnborough show–the first full-blown revision of airliner demand since September 11. The new forecast anticipates 24,000 new airplane deliveries over the next 20 years, which is actually 500 units more than the U.S. airframer had envisioned in its 2001 report.

June 19, 2007 - 5:47am

Record how long it takes to read this news item. By the time you finish reading, the world’s airlines will have spent hard-earned (or -borrowed) cash to acquire new equipment at the rate of about $8,745/second.

November 15, 2006 - 5:37am

Record numbers of orders last year indicated a short supply of available aircraft as the world’s airlines began to recover from the global recession of the early 2000s. This was good news for those with used aircraft on their hands–at least until most demand had been met, at which point placing remaining capacity became a challenge.

 
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