Lift

January 31, 2012 - 3:05pm

University of Cambridge Professor Holger Babinsky has created a one-minute video to dispel the myth that an airplane wing generates lift because the airflow moving over the upper surface has a longer distance to travel and “needs to go faster to have the same transit time as the air traveling along the lower, flat surface.” What actually causes lift, he said, “is introducing a shape into the airflow, which curves the streamlines and introduces pressure changes–lower pressure on the upper surface and higher pressure on the lower surface.

June 20, 2011 - 11:22pm

Russia’s United Aircraft Corp. (UAC) yesterday spelled out its vision for joining Boeing and Airbus as one of the world’s top three major global aerospace players. Company president Mikhail Pogosyan presented a strategic roadmap to the year 2025 here at Le Bourget, posting three major milestones for the company.

April 29, 2011 - 3:50am

The FAA has issued an update to its 2010-2011 Ground Deicing Holdover Time Tables and Guidance on its website. The document contains a revised listing of the lowest operational use temperatures (Lout) for anti-icing fluids, which were supplied to the agency and Transport Canada by the fluid manufacturers.

June 29, 2010 - 12:00pm

A U.S. district court ruling on June 17 rejected the claim by plaintiff Excel-Jet that the June 22, 2006, takeoff crash of the experimental single-engine Sport-Jet was caused by wake turbulence.

July 14, 2008 - 3:24am

A major research program launched three years ago by the European Union has identified open rotors and natural laminar flow as key technologies to be taken forward in the Clean Sky joint technology initiative and potentially into the mooted replacement for the Airbus A320.

May 28, 2008 - 8:27am

The flight department of Greek-based construction company Consolidated Contractors International was faced with a challenge when the group’s 82-year-old chairman asked them to fit his Bombardier Challenger 601-3R with a wheelchair lift. Their boss’ arthritic knees made boarding the aircraft painful, and he was sick of the indignity of having to have the crew lift him up the steps.

October 3, 2007 - 8:00am

AvAero, a maker of Learjet hush kits, has received an STC for a fuel-saving aerodynamic modification of the Boeing 737-200/300. The company claims the mod will decrease the twinjet’s fuel burn by an average of 4 percent, equating to about a 230-pph fuel-burn reduction. By repositioning the trailing-edge flaps, AvAero said it increases aft wing camber, which lets the airfoil generate the same lift at a lower angle of attack.

March 15, 2007 - 7:51am

A new control surface could reduce induced drag on commercial and business aircraft by up to 14 percent, resulting in fuel savings of more than $400 million per year across the entire U.S. air transport fleet. So claims Utah State University aeronautical engineering professor Warren Phillips, who recently introduced the devices, which he calls “twisterons.”

January 31, 2007 - 9:48am

In the January issue of AIN (page 39), we recounted the origins of the Learjet, complete with references to the well worn tale of the Swiss fighter connection. We then heard from Bill Lear’s eldest son, who suggested that “since you can’t get it straight from the horse’s mouth, here it is from the horse’s offspring, who followed closely in the horse’s hoofsteps!”

January 30, 2007 - 4:14am

AvAero of Safety Harbor, Fla., announced that Falconbridge Mining is the first customer for the FuelMizer aerodynamic modification of the Boeing 737-200/300. AvAero, which received FAA approval in April last year, EASA certification in August last year and Transport Canada approval last month, claims the FuelMizer will decrease the twinjet’s fuel burn by an average of 4 percent.

 
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