Kenn Borek Air

June 30, 2014 - 4:25pm

Canada’s Transportation Safety Board (TSB) said in a June 20 report that it was unable to determine the reason why a de Havilland Canada DHC-6-300 Twin Otter operated by Kenn Borek Air flew into terrain on January 23 last year during a VFR flight from South Pole Station to Terra Nova Bay. All three people on board perished in the crash. The flight was initially considered overdue after the crew failed to make a required position report.

January 28, 2013 - 2:31pm

The wreckage of a DHC-6 Twin Otter that went missing on a trip between the South Pole and an Italian research base in Terra Nova Bay on January 23 has been found by New Zealand air rescue helicopters. Weather prevented rescue efforts on January 23, but the aircraft’s strong ELT signal made finding it easier once the weather cleared. The aircraft, operated by Kenn Borek Air, went down in a mountainous region of the Queen Alexandra Range, where peaks rise to 12,800 feet. The three crewmembers aboard are reported to have perished in the accident.

August 1, 2012 - 1:00pm

Pratt & Whitney Canada has signed a five-year agreement with Calgary-based Kenn Borek Air under which the operator will upgrade the charter company’s fleet of Twin Otters with new PT6A-27 and PT6A-34 engines.

“This agreement provides Kenn Borek Air and [other] operators the opportunity to install new PT6A engines for both upgrade and renewal of their fleets. This agreement also includes a new engine warranty and full access to P&WC engine support at all times,” said Denis Parisien, P&WC vice president, general aviation.

December 29, 2010 - 8:07am

Hawker Beechcraft A100, Kirby Lake, Alberta, Canada, Oct. 25, 2010–The turboprop twin was destroyed when it crashed short of the runway at Kirby Lake Airport. The Canadian-registered King Air, operated by Kenn Borek Air, was carrying 10 people on a charter flight from Edmonton City Center Airport when it went down in daylight, killing one of the pilots and injuring the other nine people on board.

May 28, 2008 - 7:30am

The crews of a pair of de Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otters made history last April when they flew a daring rescue mission into the depths of the Antarctic winter, landing at the South Pole to rescue an ailing doctor. The mission braved lethally low temperatures to make an unprecedented landing in the deep-freeze of the Antarctic winter at 90 deg South–the ultimate southern destination.

 
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