Instrument landing system

March 19, 2008 - 9:34am

Swiss authorities have implemented plans for a six-degree approach angle at Lugano Agno Airport, effectively banning the airplane most frequently used there–the Saab 2000 turboprop. The rule change came as several parties jockeyed for position to start new regional operations into Lugano with Saab 2000s after Swiss International Airlines announced plans to severely curtail its service there.

February 18, 2008 - 1:40pm

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) announced it will issue revised standards for helicopter navigation this fall that are intended to take advantage of GPS receiver technology and new types of instrument approach procedures.

February 17, 2008 - 5:40pm

Airservices Australia and Qantas are working with Honeywell at Sydney Airport to supplement the signals broadcast by global navigation satellite systems. Those systems include the global positioning system that will provide the same level of precision approach guidance as a Category I instrument landing system–that is, to a height of 200 feet above the ground as long as visibility on the airport surface is adequate.

February 8, 2008 - 10:56am

Aero Commander 500B, Gaylord, Mich., Nov. 16, 2005–The pilot of the Central Air Southwest Aero Commander was killed when the airplane crashed on a nonprecision approach one mile from Gaylord Regional Airport in night IMC.

February 8, 2008 - 10:56am

Aero Commander 500B, Gaylord, Mich., Nov. 16, 2005–The pilot of the Central Air Southwest Aero Commander was killed when the airplane crashed on a nonprecision approach one mile from Gaylord Regional Airport in night IMC.

January 9, 2008 - 5:26am

Rockwell Collins has gained the first-ever TSO approval for a multi-mode receiver with microwave landing system (MLS) capability. Besides MLS, the receiver integrates VOR, ILS, marker beacon and GPS. Cat III MLS approaches are in use at a handful of European airports, most notably London Heathrow. The precision navigation concept has also been adopted by the military for set-up of “portable” precision approaches anywhere in the world.

January 7, 2008 - 10:09am

Old timers may remember ATC requests to report the “middle marker inbound.” But it’s been such a long time since they have been an integral part of an ILS (in 1992 landing penalties were removed for inoperative middle markers) that the FAA has proposed to officially drop the middle marker as a required component of the approach.

December 27, 2007 - 10:49am

Is ILS, aviation’s trusted friend for the past half century, now seeing its last days? Probably not. Some observers believe it has many years of life ahead of it, yet newer technologies are slowly entering the scene, in such diverse settings as Norway’s fjords, Heathrow’s jam-packed runways, the icy wastes of Antarctica and at several major U.S. hubs.

December 14, 2007 - 6:11am

CESSNA CARAVAN 208B, ROCKFORD, ILL., DEC. 17, 2002–At 10:51 p.m., Caravan N277PM crashed while on the ILS approach to Runway 7 at the Greater Rockford Airport (RFD). The pilot was killed and the airplane was destroyed. The Part 135 nonscheduled flight, operated by Planemasters as Flight 1627, was transporting cargo for UPS and was operating in IMC on an IFR flight plan, from Decatur Airport (DEC), Ill.

November 26, 2007 - 11:07am

A little known FAA policy statement, dated June 1 of this year, stands to dramatically change the helicopter industry as we know it. Helicopter pilots and manufacturers have long known the unique capabilities of rotorcraft, but have always been obligated to follow regulations and policies set forth and to operate in airspace designed for the much more prevalent fixed-wing aircraft.

 
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