Instrument flight rules

December 11, 2007 - 6:53am

Cessna 208B Caravan, Bellevue, Idaho, Dec. 6, 2004–Caravan N25SA, designated as Mountain Bird 1860, crashed on flat terrain about seven miles south of Bellevue. The aircraft was destroyed and the ATP pilot-in-command and another pilot on board were killed. VMC prevailed and an IFR flight plan was filed.

November 1, 2007 - 10:41am

According to the final report of the Irish Department of Transport Air Accidents Investigation Unit (AAIU) published earlier this year, a Beech King Air 90 (registration N712DB) rolled and dived during an August 2006 flight in Ireland because the owner/pilot lost control of the aircraft during a missed approach in instrument conditions. The pilot’s inexperience was deemed a factor.

October 12, 2007 - 7:24am

As an elderly, 4,300-hour pilot with a fair amount of instrument time, I was initially skeptical about Oz. But not for long. Flying the Oz simulator, tailored to match Cessna 172 performance characteristics, was completely instinctive and effortless and I had little difficulty in interpreting the display despite the lack of numerical data.

October 11, 2007 - 5:33am

The FAA is proposing numerous revisions to instrument flight rules and procedures to reflect technological advances intended to “facilitate the transition from ground-based navigation to new reference sources,” principally GPS and enhanced vision systems. The notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) cuts a 60-page swath through the Federal Register, affecting Parts 1, 71, 91, 95, 97, 121, 125, 129 and 135.

October 8, 2007 - 10:25am

Tuesday, September 11
• DOT Secretary Norman Mineta, via the FAA, ordered the grounding of all aircraft in the National Airspace System effective at 9:25 a.m. EDT. At 2:07 p.m. the final civilian flight landed. Oceanic flights inbound to the continental U.S. diverted to Canada. Canada soon closed its airspace.

October 8, 2007 - 8:19am

The days following the unprecedented shutdown of the National Airspace System caused massive grumping and anguish in the corporate and general aviation community, exacerbated when the federal government allowed only “commercial” aircraft to resume flying.

October 8, 2007 - 6:45am

Cessna 402C, Vieques, Puerto Rico, July 8, 2000–“One main landing gear tire, wheel and brake assembly, the left wing lower skin from the area above the wing flap, the left wing baggage compartment door, the right nose baggage compartment door, the cabin floor cover and some items from the U.S.

October 4, 2007 - 5:58am

Sharp rises in the number of airline flights originating from airports in the U.S. and Europe are presenting FAA and Eurocontrol officials with some daunting challenges. Chief among these is the question of how to squeeze more capacity from airports and ATC route systems that in some places already seem stretched to the breaking point.

October 2, 2007 - 11:05am

By the middle of last month, as the Bush Administration was cautiously lifting many of the September 11-inspired airspace restrictions, NBAA and other general aviation organizations continued to work for Part 91 IFR operations within the New York and Washington temporary flight restriction (TFR) areas, including Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA).

August 30, 2007 - 10:55am

An easy day of flying is not hard to define. Passengers arrive on time, good weather translates into few delays and everything on the airplane works the way it was intended. Identifying a difficult day is a bit more challenging. Is it when the crew shoots a localizer approach to minimums at night with thunderstorms all around?

 
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