Icing conditions

March 9, 2007 - 9:53am

Cessna Citation 560, Pueblo, Colo., Feb. 16, 2005–The failure of the crew to activate the de-icing boots of the Circuit City Citation on approach to Pueblo in icing conditions and failure to maintain airspeed caused the crash of the airplane, the NTSB concluded. (See page 1 for full article.)

March 9, 2007 - 9:51am

Cessna 550 Citation II, Ft. Yukon, Alaska, Sept. 30, 2005–The captain, copilot and two research scientists were not seriously injured when Citation N77ND made an off-airport, gear-up emergency landing after both engines quit simultaneously. The University of North Dakota flight was doing icing research in IFR conditions when the accident occurred.

March 7, 2007 - 9:50am

Manufacturers of very light jets (VLJs) will be affected by new Advisory Circular 23.1419-2D, which provides guidance in meeting Part 23 requirements for obtaining approval to fly into icing conditions. Comments on a draft of the circular are due by March 6. The advisory will supersede all previous policies related to ice-protection systems on Part 23 airplanes, as well as an advisory circular on contaminated-tailplane stalls.

March 7, 2007 - 6:09am

Comments are due March 5 on an FAA proposal to require a low-airspeed awareness system on Cessna 208 and 208B Caravans. The installation will cancel the prohibition against operating the turboprop single in moderate or worse icing conditions.

March 7, 2007 - 6:05am

During the January 23 public meeting on the icing-related crash of a Cessna Citation 560 near Pueblo, Colo., NTSB members criticized the FAA and Cessna for not updating critical icing information used by pilots and certification engineers.

March 5, 2007 - 9:18am

The NTSB released new and old recommendations related to the Feb. 16, 2005, stall and fatal crash of a Cessna Citation 560 in Pueblo, Colo.

February 6, 2007 - 3:59am

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) listed it as merely a serious incident but considered it significant enough to issue a full report. The incident involved the loss of control a Saab 340 experienced when it encountered icing. There were no injuries and no damage to the aircraft, but the pilots did not recover from the loss of control until the aircraft was only 112 feet above the ground.

February 2, 2007 - 9:48am

Sino Swearingen insists that the 2,500-nm-range SJ30-2 will be certified in the third quarter of this year, despite numerous program delays and the crash of S/N 002 in April 2003 (see page 1). “Three test aircraft–Serial Numbers 003, 004 and 005–are now flying seven days a week, and I’m comfortable that we will achieve FAA approval in the third quarter,” a company spokesman told AIN.

January 30, 2007 - 10:45am

Much has been written lately about the potential cost of not de-icing a business airplane before attempting to fly it, so we posed the question recently in our AINalerts twice-weekly electronic news bulletin, “What about the cost of de-icing? The price seems to vary wildly. What is the most you have paid to have a business jet de-iced? What type of airplane was it, which facility de-iced it, and what were the circumstances?”

January 24, 2007 - 10:12am

Cessna 208 Caravan, Winnipeg, Canada, Oct. 6, 2005–The Canadian Transportation Safety Board (TSB) found that, although the Morningstar Air Express Caravan took off clean, its performance diminished as ice built on its critical surfaces. Moderate icing was forecast for the area. The Caravan was also about 3 percent overweight and 488 pounds over the 8,550-pound mtow for operating in icing conditions.

 
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