Home appliances

January 28, 2013 - 2:46pm

A team of Harvard University researchers has devised a product that prevents ice and frost from forming on metal surfaces such as the leading edge of an aircraft wing.

Surfaces treated with the non-toxic, non-corrosive Slips (for slippery liquid infused porous surfaces) become ultra smooth, slippery surfaces to which fluids and solids alike, such as condensation, frost and even ice, will not adhere.

The Slips technology–tested so far on refrigerator fans–has also been proven to work effectively under high-humidity and high-pressure conditions.

December 6, 2010 - 2:28am

It should go without saying that private jet passengers generally enjoy more space, more comfortable seats and more advanced cabin systems than their airline counterparts. But the benefits of all these luxuries can be badly undermined by inadequate humidity levels in the cabin that can make the VIP traveler as weary as an economy-class pauper at the end of a long flight.

November 12, 2009 - 9:20pm

For parched Dubai 2009 visitors here in the desert it is hard to imagine that excessive humidity could be an issue. But no matter what the local outside environment, it can soon become a problem inside an aircraft full of people, not only in terms of passenger and crew comfort, but also in terms of the amount of fuel burned in carrying the excess payload of water generated by condensation.

May 5, 2008 - 6:21am

Driessen Aerospace has introduced a new “hot cup” designed originally for the Boeing 787 galley. The cup brings about three pints of water to a boil in five to seven minutes, using induction technology. The Netherlands-based galley equipment specialist suggests using the boiler for everything from simple hot water to boiling eggs to heating baby food. The pot itself can be removed and carried throughout the aircraft for service.

 
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