Global navigation satellite system

October 10, 2007 - 5:29am

Galileo, Europe’s $4.2 billion rival to GPS, is in jeopardy of cancellation following clashes between EU nations over project budgeting, officials said. Several EU nations have voiced concern about Galileo’s high cost, complaining they have been left out of commercial bidding negotiations. The first Galileo satellites need to be launched by 2005 or Europe may have to forfeit frequencies allotted by the International Telecommunications Union.

October 9, 2007 - 7:33am

As part of its evaluation of loran as a potential backup to GPS, the FAA has contracted Rock-well Collins to build a combined GPS/loran variant of its standard multimode navigation and landing receiver. The unit’s primary function will be to provide GPS navigation, with automatic switchover to loran should GPS signals be lost or degraded, and automatic reversion to GPS when normal service resumes.

October 8, 2007 - 5:13am

LAAS could end up being overtaken by a combination of the FAA’s WAAS and Europe’s GPS equivalent, Galileo. While official speakers at last month’s U.S.

August 29, 2007 - 10:57am
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A study commissioned by the NGATS Institute on behalf of the FAA’s JPDO and prepared by the advanced engineering and sciences division of ITT determined that eLoran (for enhanced) has “the highest overall preference rating…particularly in the U.S.” as a backup for satnav receivers in the event of failure or interference.

August 21, 2007 - 11:32am

A satellite navigation backup study commissioned by the JPDO has given eLoran “the highest overall preference rating...particularly in the U.S.” Not yet publicly released, the 180-page document was prepared by ITT’s advanced engineering and sciences division and assessed seven candidates against a series of essential requirements. The candidates include DME/DME/INS; GNSS/INS; eLoran; VOR; “hardened” GNSS; terrain mapping; and multilateration.

August 14, 2007 - 12:39pm

As an example of how ADS-B installation will work abroad, the Australian government and Airservices Australia, the country’s privatized ATC provider, proposed recently to cover the purchase and installation costs of ADS-B and GNSS avionics in approximately 11,000 Australian-registered aircraft with an mtow of less than 5,700 kg (12,500 pounds) under the nation’s ADS-B transition program.

March 7, 2007 - 12:33pm

In a statement that surprised Western observers, China announced late last year that it will launch its own 35-satellite, GPS-like global navigation system over the next several years. Thirty of these satellites will fly in medium-earth orbits at around 12,000 miles altitude, similar to that of GPS, while the remaining five will be equally spaced around the equator in WAAS-like geostationary orbits and perform a similar service.

February 5, 2007 - 5:42am

The French civil aviation authority, DGAC, has published the first GNSS nonprecision approach procedure for a French airport and is working toward introducing approaches with vertical guidance (APVs) once the necessary augmentation of the GPS signals is available and the relevant ICAO design criteria become effective.

January 30, 2007 - 5:13am

After 10 frustrating years of technical delays, escalating costs and contractor changes, the FAA’s GPS wide area augmentation system (WAAS) is approaching the level of performance the agency originally envisioned for it back in the late 1980s. With the system’s initial operational capability declared in 2003 and 18 months of satisfactory performance now behind them, WAAS advocates can see light at the end of the tunnel.

December 15, 2006 - 12:16pm

The French ministries of transport and defense have planned a global navigation satellite system (GNSS)/Loran C user information day on July 1 in Paris. “The information day is open to any person who has an activity related to the use of positioning or timing/synchronization information,” said the organizers. Focus will be on Loran C as a complement of GNSS.

 
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