Force

May 27, 2014 - 3:55pm

The Flaris LAR 1, the five-seat single-engine very light jet unveiled by Podgórzyn, Poland-based Flaris last June at the Paris Air Show, has recently started low-speed taxi tests, but its maiden flight has slipped again.

February 20, 2013 - 12:25pm

Duncan Aviation is authorized to modify the Universal Avionics UNS-1C flight management system to include an extended-life battery. A Duncan Aviation tech rep told AIN, “The original battery voltage was 3.6 volts and the new one is 3.93 volts. While the voltage increase in this lithium watch-type battery seems small, it makes a big difference. Previously a battery warning meant a day or two at most until you had a databus failure locking up the entire system. The new battery gives you about three months [after a warning],” he said.

January 31, 2012 - 3:05pm

University of Cambridge Professor Holger Babinsky has created a one-minute video to dispel the myth that an airplane wing generates lift because the airflow moving over the upper surface has a longer distance to travel and “needs to go faster to have the same transit time as the air traveling along the lower, flat surface.” What actually causes lift, he said, “is introducing a shape into the airflow, which curves the streamlines and introduces pressure changes–lower pressure on the upper surface and higher pressure on the lower surface.

July 28, 2009 - 7:01am

GP Aerospace, a Brazilian startup company established by former Embraer technical director Guido Pessotti, has revealed to AIN plans for a personal very light jet, which would be smaller than currently available very light jets.

May 2, 2008 - 10:10am

Turbine engine overhauler Red River Turbines has built the world’s first commercial T-9 military spec depot-level engine test cell.

July 23, 2007 - 11:00am

Automatic throttle systems are now available as a $220,000 option for new Gulfstream 200s, as well a retrofit for the more than 90 Galaxy/G200s currently in service.

June 16, 2007 - 1:15am

Texas-based ComTran on June 1 received EASA certification for its noise-cutting “advanced jet nozzle” on MD-80 airliners. When so equipped, MD-80s will meet EASA Chapter 4 noise requirements. According to ComTran, the additional equipment brings neither weight penalty nor fuel burn increase. The company also claims it does not change engine operation. It is said to even cut maintenance costs.

 
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