Flammability

October 22, 2013 - 9:35pm
Skandia can now refurbish 16-g seats, complete with engineering and TSO tags, in 21 days.

Rockford, Ill.-based Skandia (Booth No. N4925) may be known for its testing labs, signature Dax fire-resistant foam and engineering prowess, but these days it is taking on complete seat and interior sound-proof paneling projects, from engineering to recertification, according to vice president Jared Triplett.

September 11, 2013 - 9:55am

Skandia is completing its repertoire of flammability tests with the addition of heat-release and smoke-density equipment for heat, smoke and toxicity testing capabilities.

“Adding these new tests is the direct response to requests by our global customers,” said Jarod Triplett, v-p of the Davis Junction, Ill. company. “This now makes Skandia one of the few single-source testing facilities that can offer the full complement of services.” The services offered include tests required for any commercial or regional aircraft certified to carry 20 or more passengers.

April 5, 2013 - 1:25am

The Swiss Accreditation Service has officially acknowledged Lantal Laboratory as a “test center for railway and aircraft typical flammability tests pursuant to the ISO/IEC 17025 standard.”

According to the Langenthal, Switzerland-based transportation and fashion specialist, the laboratory is authorized to perform burn tests with all materials and components used in aircraft interiors.

August 6, 2008 - 6:31am

The FAA last month approved upgraded flammability standards for thermal and acoustic insulation materials used in Part 25 (transport category) aircraft. Revised standards include new tests and criteria that address flame propagation and entry into the cabin of an external fire.

December 11, 2006 - 5:52am

For years, AccuFleet has been known for its flammability testing and certification of interior cabin components and cargo compartment materials, a “hot button” for the FAA. Now the Houston-based company has added thermal acoustic materials testing to its capabilities.

October 25, 2006 - 4:52am

Bizliner operators would be required to incorporate technology to meet reduced levels of flammability exposure in fuel tanks, under FAA proposed rulemaking. The requirements would apply to new airframe designs, as well as some 3,200 U.S.-registered Airbus and Boeing airplanes in operation. In-service aircraft would have seven years from the rule’s effective date to comply. Comments on the proposal are due by March 23 next year.

 
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