Federal Flight Deck Officer

August 11, 2014 - 10:25am

The Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA) on August 7 said it was pleased to see the transfer of the Federal Flight Deck Officer Program (FFDO) by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to the assistant administrator for Training and Workforce Engagement. The FFDO allows qualified airmen to carry sidearms into the cockpit. ALPA president Lee Moak said, “TSA’s decision to bring the program under TWE is positive action to ensure that FFDOs receive the strongest possible training.”

February 3, 2014 - 12:25pm

The U.S. Supreme Court last week overturned the findings in a controversial security-based trial that initially found Air Wisconsin guilty of defamation after one of its managers in 2004 reported a pilot as unstable. The pilot claimed his ability to work in the aviation industry had been ruined based on the airline’s action.

June 10, 2013 - 1:30pm

The Air Line Pilots Association praised members of the U.S. House of Representatives on June 5 for passing an amendment to the Homeland Security appropriations bill that continues funding the union-supported Federal Flight Deck Officer program (FFDO). The FFDO allows properly trained and certified airline pilots to carry handguns in the cockpit for protection against armed intruders. The amendment, which will return $12.5 million to the program’s $25 million annual budget, is revenue-neutral and has broad bipartisan support.

March 23, 2012 - 11:07am

Despite a current mission that calls for preventing terrorism and enhancing security, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is proceeding with plans to cut funding in half—from $25.1 million to $12.5 million—for the Federal Flight Deck Officer (FFDO) program.

August 11, 2008 - 6:47am

In testimony before Congress in June, Admiral James Loy, head of the Transportation Safety Administration (TSA), stated that 1,208 of the airport passenger security screeners employed by his agency had been recently dismissed after checks of their backgrounds revealed unsatisfactory personal histories, including major felonies.

December 5, 2007 - 11:36am

Perhaps one of the least appreciated benefits of corporate aviation is that its pilots and their passengers don’t have to endure the security procedures of crowded airport terminals. But the security hassles at the airport are the least of the concerns afflicting the senior managers at the Transportation Security Administration (TSA).

January 30, 2007 - 5:37am

The idea of mixing legal weapons with pilots is not new. Aviators of yore often carried firearms–and with good reason. There are more recent incidents that support the practice. In the mid-1960s, an airliner was taken over by a man wielding a gun who shot both pilots. In another incident a disgruntled PSA employee broke into the cockpit of a BAe 146 in 1987 and shot and killed both pilots.

September 28, 2006 - 11:59am
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Perhaps one of the least appreciated benefits of corporate aviation is that its pilots and their passengers don’t have to endure the security procedures of crowded airport terminals. But the security hassles at the airport are the least of the concerns afflicting the senior managers at the Transportation Security Administration (TSA).

 
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