European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service

May 22, 2014 - 10:15am

Rockwell Collins received EASA certification of its Pro Line 4 to Pro Line 21 avionics retrofit for the Falcon 2000 and Falcon 2000EX. The Pro Line 21 retrofit features four 10- by 8-inch LCD panels and Waas/Egnos capability, as well as support for electronic charts and graphical weather. The upgrade is also available for the Falcon 50EX. The first installation is scheduled for this summer at a Ruag maintenance facility in Germany. An upgrade for Fans-1/A will be available next year for these Falcons.

May 18, 2014 - 4:00am
Small and medium-size airports in Europe often lack the infrastructure necessary to enable complex approaches, limiting the utility of the airport. EGNOS, and the highly accurate position data it provides, makes these airports more accessible for business aviation operations without the cost of complicated ground structure.

The European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) provides clear benefits to the business aviation sector. With many business aircraft not specifically catered to by current air traffic management systems, more often than not they find themselves shut out of many key airports.

This is particularly true as Europe’s skies continue to become more and more crowded. As air traffic continues to grow, smaller airports must make themselves accessible at all times–something that cannot be done when relying solely on nonprecision approaches.

November 2, 2013 - 1:40am
Sigmund Lockert

The European helicopter industry must educate operators about the benefits of Sesar, the European Union’s next-generation air traffic management (ATM) systems and procedures, if it is to derive any benefits from the system, according to several speakers at a conference on “The future of the rotorcraft sector” at Helitech.

September 23, 2013 - 3:05pm

Any of the 6,000 helicopters that annually use the helipad at Eurocopter’s facility in Donauwörth, Germany, will now find arrivals easier in poor weather with the recent certification of a GPS localizer performance with vertical guidance (LPV) approach to the pad, one of the few in Europe certified for all-weather operations.

In 2008 Donauwörth became the first European helipad to introduce satellite-based Rnav (area navigation) specifically for use by rotorcraft.

September 19, 2013 - 1:25pm

Eurocopter obtained the first license in Europe permitting localizer-performance with vertical guidance (LPV) approaches on a helipad, at its development and production facility in Donauwörth, Germany. The helicopter manufacturer emphasized that such a procedure improves safety in poor visibility, since aircraft can overfly obstacles more safely.

July 23, 2013 - 3:00pm

Eurocopter demonstrated new automated landing procedures relying on Egnos (Europe’s Waas equivalent) satellite guidance. Part of Europe’s Clean Sky research project, the tests were performed on an EC155 medium twin. They showed significant reductions in the helicopter’s perceived sound footprint, the company said. The noise-abatement flightpaths were compatible with IFR operations and can be tailored to local requirements.

July 1, 2013 - 12:45am

If ever there was a Comeback Kid in avionics, it would have to be the FAA’s wide area augmentation system (Waas). Heralded by the agency in 1994 as the future Swiss Army knife of navigation, Waas was going to bring greater accuracy and enhanced reliability to the sometimes unpredictable GPS and, in so doing, promised a new era where satellites would replace not only the nation’s NDBs and VORs, but also the more than 600 Category 1 ILS installations in the National Airspace System at the time. Development would cost more than $300 million, and take about four years.

November 2, 2012 - 12:35am

We often think of the FAA as a cumbersome organization that usually–but not always–gets the job done, often in its own sweet time. But with its Waas space-based augmentation system (Sbas) program, the agency has shown it can also move quickly.

November 2, 2012 - 12:35am

We often think of the FAA as a cumbersome organization that usually–but not always–gets the job done, often in its own sweet time. But with its Waas space-based augmentation system (Sbas) program, the agency has shown it can also move quickly.

May 16, 2012 - 12:10am

EU-funded project Accepta is co-funding the publishing of Egnos (European Geostationary Navigation Overlay System) landing procedures and/or installing its navigation equipment at 40 additional airports in 11 European countries by the end of 2013. The countries soon to get the system at their airports include Finland, France, Italy, UK, Austria and Spain. Egnos, Europe’s equivalent of Waas GPS, has many benefits including operational, economic (especially for business aviation), safety and environmental, said the company.

 
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