Engineered materials arrestor system

September 9, 2013 - 1:05pm

Construction begins today on Runway 6/24 at Trenton Mercer Airport (KTTN), New Jersey, that will significantly restrict its use. The work, to install engineered material arresting systems (Emas) on both ends of the runway, will continue until November 8. Some approach and runway lighting and instrument approach systems will be unavailable and the runway will be closed to aircraft with approach speeds greater than 121 knots. The runway’s usable length will also be shortened by more than 750 feet. Construction work will be under way for approximately 20 hours each day.

July 1, 2013 - 2:30pm

On June 27 construction concluded on an engineered materials arresting system (Emas) added to the new runway safety area (RSA) at the departure end of Boston Logan’s Runway 33L. The new crushable concrete system sits atop a 300-foot-wide concrete pier that extends nearly 500 feet into the water. The Emas itself covers an area 500 feet long and 170 feet wide.

July 16, 2012 - 4:35pm

Ninety percent of airplanes that run off the end of runways are traveling at less than 60 knots when they exit, according to FAA data. Most of these airplanes came to a stop within 1,000 feet of the end.

June 1, 2012 - 5:40am
Citation

Few these days would question the effectiveness of engineered material arresting systems (Emas) in stopping wayward aircraft, and to prove the point Key West International Airport pulled off a double last fall. In the span of four days, the airport (which had not experienced a runway overrun in 30 years) saw two business jets suffer apparent brake failures while landing in opposite directions on its 4,801-foot runway 09/27. At the east end of the runway there was an Emas; at the west end there was not.

May 1, 2012 - 3:58pm

The Massachusetts Port Authority has begun a seven-month closure of Runway 15R/33L at Boston Logan International Airport for resurfacing and to complete Runway Safety Area (RSA) construction at the departure end of Runway 15R. Following daily closures this month, the runway will be completely closed starting about June 15 through late September, ending with daily closures again in October and November. The enhanced RSA will extend the existing Engineered Material Arresting System (EMAS) bed to a total of 500 feet.

October 10, 2011 - 4:40am

Zodiac Aerospace comes into NBAA 2011 buoyed by an agreement with its banks to increase the amount and maturity of its financing. According to the French aerospace equipment and systems provider (Booth No. N6229), the agreement “reinforces the group’s financial capabilities and gives it the possibility to actively pursue its external growth strategy.”

October 13, 2010 - 7:49am

Products made by Zodiac Aerospace (Booth No. 3452) touch almost every aspect of aviation, from cabin interiors to emergency systems and fuel and electrical power management systems. And while pilots hope that they don’t have to take advantage of emergency systems, one Zodiac division–the Engineered Arresting Systems Corp. (Esco)–makes a product that has resulted in some remarkable saves that undoubtedly make flight crews extremely grateful.

August 2, 2010 - 9:36am

Dassault Falcon 10, Minneapolis, May 28, 2010–The twinjet made a safe emergency landing after losing its nosewheel on takeoff from Flying Cloud Airport in Eden Prairie, Minn. The pilots immediately felt something was amiss and flew by the tower, which confirmed the damage to the landing gear.

March 31, 2010 - 7:23am

The city of Bridgeport, Conn., received court approval to buy an acre
of land next to Sikorsky Memorial Airport and plans to build an engineered materials arresting system (Emas) safety area for Runway 6/24. According to NBAA, “The addition of an Emas runway safety area at BDR has been a source of conflict for nearly a decade because the airport is owned by Bridgeport but located in Stratford.”

January 28, 2010 - 4:29am

The underwear bomber’s abortive attempt to blow up a Northwest/Delta flight from Amsterdam to Detroit quickly overshadowed aviation’s other lucky break this past Christmas season–American Flight 331 from Miami to Kingston, Jamaica, which slid off a rain-soaked runway, breaking the fuselage in three places and injuring scores of people.

 
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