Dangerous goods

August 4, 2014 - 4:15pm

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration issued safety regulations July 31 for transporting lithium batteries by air, a move intended to harmonize existing U.S. rules with international standards. The Air Line Pilots Association praised the action as recognition of the serious risk unregulated shipments of lithium batteries pose to all who depend on air transportation.

April 7, 2014 - 11:00am

Amazon paid an FAA penalty of $91,000 last week for shipping a package via FedEx on Sept. 16, 2013, containing a flammable liquid adhesive considered to be a hazardous material. Amazon offered the shipment without the requisite shipping papers or emergency response information and did not mark, label or properly package the shipment. Amazon also failed to train its employees properly in preparing hazmat packages for shipment by air.

October 2, 2013 - 12:10am
Hazmat manufacturers have until mid-2015 to begin using the new pictogram symbols on their products.

In an effort to align its standards with much of the world, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued changes in the way it will require the labeling of hazardous materials in the future. These changes will conform to the U.N. standard or globally harmonized systems of classification and labeling of chemicals (GHS) and will affect all U.S. aircraft operators and service providers. They involve a series of new pictograms on the labels of potentially hazardous chemicals as well as a new format for safety data sheets that must accompany all hazardous chemicals.

August 21, 2013 - 12:17pm

Aviation Training Academy (ATA) has launched an online training program directed at FBOs, corporate flight departments, municipalities, fueling agents, line service technicians and mechanics. New regulations, under the globally harmonized system (GHS) of classification and labeling of chemicals, adopted by OSHA mandate that employers must have their employees trained on the new GHS label elements and safety data sheet format.

July 29, 2013 - 2:15pm

Thousands of flight department employees, such as aircraft maintenance technicians, will be required by December 1 to take U.S. government-mandated hazardous material (hazmat) training to help them identify and protect themselves against potentially hazardous materials and situations.

July 24, 2013 - 11:55am

Flight departments will have a new federal regulation to contend with regarding hazardous materials. New regulations from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Osha) mandate the training of thousands of flight department employees by December 1 to educate them on how to identify and protect themselves from hazardous chemicals used in the workplace. The Hazard Communication Standard will be fully implemented in 2016.

December 10, 2012 - 2:21pm

One provision of the Congressional FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 required the FAA to develop a policy under which the requirements of the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration could apply to cabin crewmembers. The FAA’s aviation safety regulations always take precedence, but OSHA might be able to enforce certain occupational safety and health standards currently not covered by FAA oversight.

August 20, 2010 - 11:48am

The FAA is seeking a $65,000 civil penalty from fractional-share operator Flight Options for shipping a package that leaked a hazardous material. According to the agency, Flight Options offered "a fiberboard box containing isopropyl alcohol, a flammable liquid, to UPS for transportation by air from Cleveland to Las Vegas, Sept. 9, 2009." The package leaked, and UPS employees discovered the leakage at the company's Louisville, Ky. sorting hub.

July 31, 2008 - 10:02am

The Transportation Department has created a new FAA office for internal security and hazardous materials, and 24-year FAA veteran Lynne Osmus has been named to head it. The 450 employees in her office will oversee the FAA’s hazardous materials program, personnel and contractor security investigations, as well as security for FAA facilities.

July 11, 2008 - 6:25am

American Eagle executives planned to meet with FAA officials last month to discuss the Dallas-based airline’s alleged violations of hazardous-materials regulations. The FAA alleges that on one occasion in 2000 American Eagle transported an oxygen generator as cargo aboard a passenger flight. It also claims that Eagle improperly offered oxygen generators to Federal Express for shipment by air on seven separate occasions.

 
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