CUNY Aviation Institute

January 9, 2012 - 1:26pm

After four decades in aviation, having seen the best–and worst–of the industry, I am still moved by some of the unheralded work of the folks who work in and around aviation. While the heroes of flight (yes, Sully, you are one of them) do get the recognition they justly deserve, there are others in all kinds of occupations who do amazing work for little, if any, public recognition.

March 26, 2011 - 11:00am

by Amy Laboda

May 10, 2010 - 5:38am

College majors and career opportunities don’t always match up. Students have always majored in subjects that have few job prospects. Take philosophy, for example. Every year students major in philosophy, yet I can’t recall ever seeing a help wanted ad for a philosopher.

March 30, 2010 - 9:07am

Safety was the primary topic of discussion at the 21st annual Women in Aviation International (WAI) Conference, held at the Disney Coronado Springs Resort in Orlando, Fla., from February 25 to 27. The three-day conference brings together members from all over the world to share ideas and to network.

June 2, 2009 - 11:37am

The aerospace industry needs to make a concerted effort to attract young people to aviation careers, according to presenters at this year’s New Jersey State Aviation Conference, the theme of which was “Challenges in Aviation Education.”
The need to attract new talent becomes increasingly important as industry professionals age. “The whole aviation industry

May 21, 2008 - 6:46am

It is common knowledge within the field of aviation that there is a diminishing pool of pilots and mechanics from which to fill a growing demand. But the situation is not quite so simple. Gary Kiteley, executive director of the University Aviation Association, said that while enrollments in collegiate aviation programs began increasing about three years ago, it is important to consider the inherent time lag in producing viable employees.

May 7, 2008 - 11:37am

The aviation industry has often been heavily focused on the requirement for new-hire pilots to have a college degree, that is up until the past few years when the supply of university-educated applicants began to evaporate. Since supply and demand dictated hiring more people without a college-level education, the industry looked toward high-school graduates who have worked their way up.

November 1, 2006 - 11:50am

Aviation high schools and aviation programs aimed at high-school students have been providing the industry with a trained work force for more than 80 years. The goal of the early programs was primarily to serve the needs of the industry by ensuring a steady stream of trained mechanics.

 
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