Asiana Airlines

July 11, 2014 - 6:10am
During pre-certification testing, the Airbus A350XWB  twin-aisle twinjet underwent water ingestion trials on a long military runway at Istres, France, that also is used for high- and maximum-energy rejected takeoff work.

Airbus has begun airline crew training for its A350XWB customers about six months ahead of the new twin-aisle twinjet’s entry into service, scheduled for late this year, according to chief test pilot Peter Chandler, who flew the aircraft on its maiden flight in June 2013. He reports that the training syllabus has been developed and that the first A350 pilot course was under way last month, with access to a full flight simulator. Launch customer Qatar Airways and Singapore Airlines have received demonstration flights.

June 30, 2014 - 4:45pm

The NTSB last week distributed 27 safety recommendations before issuing its findings on the probable cause of the July 6, 2013 crash of an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 just short of Runway 28L at San Francisco International Airport.

June 30, 2014 - 4:15pm

Asiana Airlines released a statement on June 24 closely following the NTSB’s finding of probable cause for the July 6, 2013 crash of Flight 214 at San Francisco International Airport. The South Korean airline said, “The NTSB made four training recommendations to Asiana, all of which Asiana has already implemented. We believe the NTSB has properly recognized the multiple factors that contributed to the accident, including the complexities of the autothrottle and autopilot systems, which the agency found were inadequately described by Boeing in its training and operational manuals.”

June 25, 2014 - 9:52am

Chinese carriers have canceled several flights to Kota Kinabalu in response to poor market demand and safety concerns following a spate of kidnappings of Taiwanese and Chinese tourists in the east Malaysian state of Sabah since April.

June 24, 2014 - 3:54pm

The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board has determined that Asiana Flight 214 crashed on July 6 last year at San Francisco International Airport because the flight crew mismanaged the approach and inadequately monitored airspeed. Announcing the findings at a meeting on Tuesday in Washington, D.C., the Board also found that the complexities of the autothrottle and autopilot flight director systems and the crew’s misunderstanding of those systems contributed to the accident.

June 23, 2014 - 12:10pm

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is expected to announce the probable cause of last summer’s crash of an Asiana Boeing 777 at San Francisco International airport at a June 24 meeting. The doors to the NTSB’s board room at 429 l’Enfant Plaza SW, in Washington, D.C. open at 7:30 a.m. EST, with the meeting due to begin at 9:30 a.m. EST. The session can also be viewed online.

May 19, 2014 - 1:30am
Flight Safety Foundation president and CEO, Jon Beatty

The Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) has a new president and CEO, Jon Beatty, who until recently held the same positions with International Aero Engines. He comes to the aviation safety advocate with solid manufacturing industry experience, having begun his career as a quality engineer with Sikorsky. He was confirmed in his post in April and is now heading up FSF’s efforts to promote further advances in flight safety.

May 14, 2014 - 10:47am

The South Korean government has prohibited the country’s airlines from setting up low-cost joint venture operations with foreign carriers. This week’s order from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport (MLIT) came in response to demands by some local low-cost carriers (LCCs) that the domestic market deserves protection from foreign-backed competition.

May 12, 2014 - 10:51am

Jon Beatty began his tenure as the Flight Safety Foundation’s new CEO last month, replacing Kevin Hiatt, who has joined the International Air Transportation Association. Aircraft go-arounds remain one of the top concerns for the FSF and its new leader.

April 7, 2014 - 11:30am

Last week the NTSB released a letter it received in mid-March from South Korea’s Aviation and Railway Accident Investigation Board (KARAIB) claiming that the pilots of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 were not totally responsible for the accident last July at San Francisco International Airport that killed three people and destroyed a Boeing 777.

 
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