Air Accidents Investigation Branch

May 7, 2008 - 7:50am

The UK’s Air Accident Investigation Branch (AAIB) boasts a permanent staff of just 45 people and a seemingly modest annual budget of £4.5 million ($6.3 million). Almost three-quarters of its personnel–31 people–are accident inspectors, including four principal inspectors (two covering operations and two for engineering); 10 operations and 10 engineering inspectors; and four FDR and CVR specialists.

May 7, 2008 - 7:45am

The Air Accident Investigation Branch (AAIB) of the UK’s Department of Transport, Local Government and the Regions (DTLR) lays claim to being the world’s oldest team of aircraft crash investigators, dating its origins to 1915 as part of the Royal Flying Corps (RFC).

May 5, 2008 - 7:03am

Cessna 500 Citation I, Farnborough, Kent, England, March 30, 2008–The crew of the Bahamian-registered Citation I reported engine vibration soon after takeoff from Biggin Hill and called “Mayday” before being cleared to return to land. The jet hit a residence about three miles from the airport. All five people on board were killed, including the pilot, copilot and touring car driver David Leslie and team owner Richard Lloyd.

April 1, 2008 - 12:46pm

The crew of a Cessna Citation I that came down soon after takeoff from Biggin Hill Airport, southeast of London, on Sunday is understood to have reported engine vibration before the accident, which killed all five on board. A pilot flying nearby reported hearing the Citation–S/N 500-0287 and registered VP-BGE–make a “mayday” call before being cleared to return to land.

February 19, 2008 - 9:19pm

The UK air accidents investigation branch (AAIB) has issued a safety recommendation calling for Boeing to notify all 777 operators that they should change safety procedures during an emergency landing in the type.

February 8, 2008 - 4:40am

The UK Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) last month issued a sweeping recommendation that the EASA, FAA, Transport Canada and other aviation agencies amend requirements for the design and installation of electronic components in aircraft so that fluid and moisture contamination, as a source of common cause failures, is specifically taken into account.

February 8, 2008 - 4:40am

The UK Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) last month issued a sweeping recommendation that the EASA, FAA, Transport Canada and other aviation agencies amend requirements for the design and installation of electronic components in aircraft so that fluid and moisture contamination, as a source of common cause failures, is specifically taken into account.

January 24, 2008 - 10:45am

The UK Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) recently issued a sweeping recommendation that the EASA, FAA, Transport Canada and other aviation agencies amend requirements for the design and installation of electronic components in aircraft to take into account fluid and moisture contamination, as a source of common cause failures.

January 24, 2008 - 10:45am

The UK Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) recently issued a sweeping recommendation that the EASA, FAA, Transport Canada and other aviation agencies amend requirements for the design and installation of electronic components in aircraft to take into account fluid and moisture contamination, as a source of common cause failures.

January 31, 2007 - 5:12am

The British Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) has issued its report on an accident last January. A British-registered Robinson R44 (G-NUDE), ditched and sank on an attempted flight between Cabo de Hornos, Chile, and Teniente Marsh Airbase on King George Island, Antarctica. The two occupants were rescued after 10 hours in seas of 35 degrees F.

 
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