GS Yuasa

April 29, 2013 - 11:28am

As Ethiopian Airlines and other Boeing 787 customers prepared to return their Dreamliners to service with battery system modification kits, the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) conducted an exhaustive, two-day investigative hearing into the design and certification of the lithium-ion batteries implicated in the airplane’s grounding. Sixteen witnesses testified and answered questions during the hearing on April 23 and 24 at the Board’s Washington, D.C., headquarters.

April 23, 2013 - 5:16pm
Boeing 787 chief project engineer Michael Sinnett

U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) members and technical specialists questioned representatives of Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday about assumptions they made in determining the probability of lithium-ion batteries failing on the Boeing 787 Dreamliner.

March 7, 2013 - 12:31pm

The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) continues to focus on the design, certification and manufacturing processes of the lithium-ion battery system used on the grounded Boeing 787.

February 28, 2013 - 3:13pm

Boeing Commercial Airplanes president and CEO Ray Conner met with Japanese Minister of Land, Infrastructure and Transportation Akihiro Ota in Tokyo on Thursday to discuss the company’s proposal to return the Boeing 787 to service.

January 24, 2013 - 6:55pm
787 battery examined in NTSB Materials Lab

The damaged lithium-ion APU battery from the Japan Air Lines Boeing 787 that caught fire on January 7 while parked at Boston’s Logan Airport experienced an uncontrolled chemical reaction known as a “thermal runway” and short circuiting, but the cause and sequence of these events are still unknown, according to the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB).

January 21, 2013 - 12:55pm

Data from the flight recorder retrieved from the Japan Air Lines Boeing 787 that caught fire on January 7 while parked at Boston Logan International Airport shows that the airplane’s APU battery did not charge beyond its design limit of 32 volts, according to the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board.

 
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