Aviation

June 17, 2013 - 2:55pm

During the Paris Air Show aerospace media dinner on Sunday at the Aero Club de France, the Flight Safety Foundation presented its Cecil A. Brownlow Publication Award to FAA Safety Briefing, the bimonthly publication and active online community serving pilots, flight instructors and aircraft technicians that is produced by the U.S. FAA. The FSF said the award is usually presented at the organization’s annual International Air Safety Summit, but this year it decided to bestow the award at the Paris Air Show.

June 17, 2013 - 2:45pm
Female Signing

The latest attempt to launch a European Male (Medium Altitude Long Endurance) UAV development was highlighted here yesterday when the chief executive officers of Alenia, Dassault and EADS Cassidian shook hands. The three companies said they “have a common view” on a joint program to meet “the security needs of our European governments and armed forces.”

June 17, 2013 - 1:40pm

The FAA plans changes to some procedures for flights into three Colorado airports for the 2013-2014 Christmas holiday season, according to the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA). Specifically, the FAA will discontinue use of its air-traffic slot-reservation program for Aspen Airport (ASE), Eagle County Regional Airport (EGE) and Garfield County “Rifle” (RIL) airports during this year’s November-through-January holiday season.

The FAA plans to manage traffic volume with other tools, including in-trail spacing and ground delay programs.

June 17, 2013 - 1:35pm

“A new informal agreement” by European transport ministers has “watered down” a proposal by the European Commission for better prevention of aviation incidents and accidents, according to a June 10 statement issued by the European Cockpit Association (ECA). The pilot professional association said key issues altered include provisions for non-punitive mandatory and voluntary reporting, as well as the obligations of EU member states to ensure adequate safety oversight.

June 17, 2013 - 1:30pm

The UK’s Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) released a report in early June detailing how a crew approaching Scotland’s Glasgow Airport (EGPF) flew through an assigned altitude by inadvertently activating the “go-around” button on a Beechcraft King Air 200 just as the autopilot was about to capture a preset altitude. The ensuing confusion during the nighttime IMC incident was compounded by the specific cockpit setup of the King Air they were flying, which was different from the version they normally operated.

June 17, 2013 - 1:15pm
SkyWest Embraer E2-195

Embraer launched the new E2 version of its E-Jets yesterday with firm orders, purchase rights, options and letters of intent totaling 350 airplanes from seven customers.

June 17, 2013 - 1:15pm
Bell SLS

John Garrison, president and CEO of Bell Helicopter, announced yesterday morning at the Paris Air Show that it is developing a new “short, light single” (SLS) helicopter that will be powered by a Turbomeca Arrius 2R turboshaft engine. The new, “clean sheet” aircraft, which Garrison said is expected to fly next year, will be the first Bell helicopter to be powered by a Turbomeca engine. Certification of the new helicopter will take place “as quickly as possible” after the first flight.

June 17, 2013 - 1:00pm
Su-35

Russian aviation will make a splash at this year’s Paris Air Show with the fourth-generation-plus Su-35 multirole fighter flying unrivaled by anything comparable from the U.S. military. In fact, there will be no U.S. government-owned military airplanes either flying or on static display because of the automatic “sequestration” budget cuts roiling the Pentagon. This is the first time since 2001 that a Russian fighter will take part in the Paris flying display and the first time that a U.S. fighter is absent from the event since 1991.

June 17, 2013 - 1:00pm

A student at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is working on a Capstone project to complete his master’s degree. Specifically, Mitchell Serber’s research looks at precursors to loss of control in flight (LOC-I). To take part in his 10- to 15-minute survey, pilots must currently be qualified on a U.S. Part 121/125 carrier’s multi-engine turbine-powered aircraft. The aircraft must also be autopilot equipped.

June 17, 2013 - 11:35am

Airbus began the 2,500-hour flight-test program for the A350 XWB when the new long-range widebody took off for the first time at almost exactly 10 a.m. local time in Toulouse, France, on Friday. The eagerly awaited first flight over southwestern France lasted slightly more than four hours and the twinjet, powered by Rolls-Royce Trent XWB engines, touched down safely back in Toulouse at 2:05 p.m.

 
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