Accidents, Safety, Security and Training » Safety

News and information on safety procedures and concerns.

October 8, 2007 - 10:15am

Transportation Security Administration (TSA) airport directors are being assigned to 450 of the busiest U.S. airports used by the airlines. These officials are responsible for TSA employees at those airports as well as for airport security provisions. Business aviation and other general aviation associations are encouraging their members to develop
a rapport with their TSA airport directors, so as to increase their understanding of

October 8, 2007 - 10:05am

Security comes from a combination of policy, procedure and technology–nuts and bolts. All three have received their fair share of attention since September 11, but the demand for security hardware is the most tangible manifestation of how aviation has changed. Pre-existing examples of technology–from sophisticated electronic surveillance systems to simple wheel locks–have been improved.

October 8, 2007 - 9:40am

Some forest fires start with a blast of jagged lightning, incinerating the dry timber and flinging the flaming fragments into the tinder-dry underbrush from which flames soon reach skyward.

October 8, 2007 - 6:48am

The NTSB has called on the FAA to require more extensive inspections of transport-category airplanes for possible structural damage after they encounter severe turbulence. The recommendations are based on the Safety Board’s investigation of several incidents in which more stringent inspections than currently required by the manufacturers’ aircraft maintenance manuals (AMMs) revealed serious damage. One of the incidents involved a Nov.

October 8, 2007 - 6:41am

Perhaps as an example of the NTSB moving forward on long-outstanding issues, it has asked the FAA to require nonscheduled Part 135 operators to report activity data annually, including flight hours, revenue miles, aircraft types and missions.

October 4, 2007 - 7:26am

In response to requests from corporate aviation managers, the Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) has compiled “Waterproof Flight Operations,” the current 664-page issue of Flight Safety Digest, which it says contains information that has not been readily available for corporate, fractional, on-demand and commuter operators.

October 4, 2007 - 7:20am

An airborne telemedical emergency-assistance kit is an item often overlooked in the interior completion and refurbishment process, particularly on smaller aircraft. Now ER-Link of West Bend, Wis., is offering a solution in the form of an FAA-approved kit designed specifically for use in small business aircraft. It offers the advantage of simultaneous voice and data transmission.

October 3, 2007 - 11:44am

MedAire said it has become the “first in the world” ready to receive remote vital-sign medical-monitoring data from civil aircraft in flight. The company’s first subscriber for this service is British Midland Airways, which will equip all of its long-haul flights with the Tempus 2000 remote vital-sign monitor from London-based Remote Diagnostic Technologies.

October 3, 2007 - 11:11am

Ever since the nerve-shattering morning of September 11, the skies over Manhattan have been strangely quiet. At first it was the same sort of silence that settled over the rest of the U.S.–the product of a total operations ban that was the national airspace lockdown.

October 3, 2007 - 10:13am

The fatal accident rate for business jet operations worldwide (fatal accidents per 100,000 flight hours) increased annually from 1998 to 2001 before decreasing in 2002, and from 1998 through 2002 air taxis had the highest fatal rate of all segments of turbine business airplane operations, according to figures in a new publication from the International Business Aviation Council. IBAC, in conjunction with Robert E.

 
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