Regulations and Government

News about bills, laws, regulations and other governmental decisions affecting aviation and aerospace. Topics include FAA reauthorizations, taxes on fuel and aviation activities, environmental legislation, ICAO decisions, governmental mediation of labor conflicts and World Trade Organization disputes and decisions.

February 11, 2014 - 3:58pm

As the aviation world awaits U.S. District Court Judge John Walker’s ruling in a case involving the city of Santa Monica’s attempts to close Santa Monica Airport, AOPA and NBAA filed an amicus curiae (friends of the court) brief to support the FAA’s motion to dismiss the city’s complaint.

February 11, 2014 - 3:28pm

The Air Line Pilots Association International, FBI and FAA have jointly launched a campaign across 12 U.S. cities to raise public awareness about the consequences of illegal laser attacks on aircraft cockpits. Reports of aircraft laser illuminations in the U.S. have increased sharply over the past few years (partially fueled by an FAA website set up to report such incidents), from 2,836 in 2010 to 3,960 in 2013.

February 11, 2014 - 5:00am

The Indian government last week stalled completion of several major military equipment deals until at least the end of the current financial year on March 31. “We have no money,” said defense minister A. K. Antony at the Defexpo show in New Dehli on Thursday.

February 9, 2014 - 6:00pm
Ice crystals can penetrate far into an engine and cause serious icing issues. Photo: NASA

Researchers are gradually coming to understand the physics of in-flight engine icing due to ice crystals. In response to this enhanced knowledge of the subject, civil aviation authorities, such as the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), are considering more stringent certification requirements.

February 9, 2014 - 6:00pm

Current in-flight icing detection systems (FIDS) cannot detect ice crystals. But equipment manufacturer Zodiac Aerospace (Booth E07) is developing a new FIDS, using optical techniques. It will detect any form of icing and will be able to tell which form of ice–small or large supercooled droplets, crystal and so forth–is impacting the aircraft. It will give the crew specific warnings when large-droplet icing conditions or ice crystals are encountered, François Larue, head of research and technology of Zodiac’s Aircraft Systems division, told AIN.

February 7, 2014 - 11:10pm
Regional subsidiaries of flag carriers were among the fastest growing operators in Southeast Asia for 2013, including Singapore Airlines’ SilkAir.

The Single Aviation Market (SAM) of the 10-member Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is not coming about as fast as some had hoped–the aim had been by 2015. This is despite the advantages they see through liberalization of air services under a single and unified air transport market.

February 7, 2014 - 11:00pm
AirAsia is the largest LCC group operating in Southeast Asia, with a current in-service fleet of 172 aircraft.

Southeast Asia benefits from having one of the fastest growing economies in the world, driven by the expansion of the trade and tourism sectors.

February 6, 2014 - 1:15pm

Even though the FAA is providing funding for several airlines to purchase ADS-B equipment, the agency likely will not be able to mandate ADS-B in technology by 2020, as it is required to do by the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012, Transportation Department inspector general Calvin Scovel III told Congress yesterday.

February 6, 2014 - 1:05pm

The EASA has certified the Airbus Helicopters EC175 medium twin, issuing the type certificate last Thursday. On January 28, the airframer announced it had completed the certification process and was expecting the certificate within days, which the EASA qualified by indicating the document would be delivered in the first quarter. An EASA spokesman confirmed yesterday that the final paperwork was completed more quickly than anticipated.

February 6, 2014 - 1:00pm

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has issued a final repair station security rule 10 years after its congressional mandate. Implementation ends an FAA ban on certifying new foreign repair stations. The final rule is significantly less controversial than a proposed rule issued in November 2009, as it doesn’t mandate any new security programs or plans.

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