Aviation International News » June 2009

June 5, 2009 - 5:32am

Eclipse EA-500, Rockford, Ill., July 17, 2008–The NTSB has determined the probable cause of the separation of the left-side wing-to-body fairing was improper installation of the leading edge of the panel, causing the fairing to separate from the airplane during an encounter with turbulence. A contributing factor was the reduced surface area secured by use of small-head screws and grommets for attaching the fairing.

June 5, 2009 - 5:30am

Two Bell 407s, Flagstaff, Ariz., June 29, 2008–The NTSB determined the probable cause of the accident was the failure of both pilots to see and avoid the other on approach to the helipad at Flagstaff Medical Center (FMC). The daylight
VMC midair involved helicopters operated by Classic Helicopters and Air Methods.

June 5, 2009 - 5:26am

Hughes 269B, Salesville, Ark., July 15, 2008–The board ruled that the probable cause of the helicopter crash was the pilot’s failure to maintain clearance from the crossing power transmission line. The helicopter’s rotor blades struck a high-voltage power line while on line patrol looking for vegetation encroachment. The helicopter was destroyed and the pilot and passenger were killed.

June 5, 2009 - 5:16am

Hawker Beechcraft King Air B200, Taylor, Texas, April 10, 2008–The NTSB ruled that the probable cause of the accidental death of a mechanic was the failure of the pilot and mechanic to ensure that the airplane was fully depressurized before opening the cabin door. Contributing to the accident was a failure in the airplane’s vacuum system.

June 4, 2009 - 12:17pm

Hawker Beechcraft King Air B200, Taylor, Texas, April 10, 2008–The NTSB ruled that the probable cause of the accidental death of a mechanic was the failure of the pilot and mechanic to ensure that the airplane was fully depressurized before opening the cabin door. Contributing to the accident was a failure in the airplane’s vacuum system.

June 4, 2009 - 12:10pm

Hawker Beechcraft King Air A100, Chino, Calif., Nov. 6, 2007–The NTSB blamed the crash of the King Air A100 on “the pilot’s failure to maintain a positive climb rate during an instrument takeoff.” A contributing factor to the accident was low visibility.

June 4, 2009 - 12:05pm

Hawker Beechcraft King Air C90, Bloomingdale, Ga., Sept. 15, 2007– According to the board, the probable cause of the crash of the King Air C90 was “loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion as a result of the pilot’s improper preflight planning and preparation.

June 4, 2009 - 11:38am

Hawker Beechcraft King Air A100, San Miguel, Venezuela, March 1, 2009–The turboprop twin operated by Command Air crashed into a mountain, killing both pilots and four passengers. Operating under a VFR flight plan, the flight was in IMC when it hit terrain at an altitude of 9,300 feet, 22 miles from the destination airport.

June 4, 2009 - 11:32am

Bombardier Learjet 35A, Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 24, 2009–The co-pilot who was flying the aircraft at the time inadvertently lined up for landing on the wrong runway. Approximately one mile from touchdown, the co-pilot decided to maneuver to land on the correct runway.

June 4, 2009 - 11:29am

Cessna 650, Trigoria, Italy, Feb. 7, 2009–The Italian-registered Citation III was destroyed and the pilot and co-pilot were killed when it crashed about four minutes after takeoff from Rome’s Ciampino Airport. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the departure airport for the flight, which was destined for Bologna. The Italian Aircraft Accident Investigation Bureau is investigating.

 
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