Aviation International News » February 2012

February 4, 2012 - 3:40am

Cirrus has restructured more than $13 million worth of loan and lease obligations related to its Grand Forks, N.D. production facility with that city’s Growth Fund. Cirrus employs approximately 90 people in Grand Forks who make composite component parts for its SR-series piston aircraft, which are then shipped to the company’s assembly line in Duluth, Minn.

February 4, 2012 - 3:15am
Embraer’s Legacy 450 cabin

Spurred by sluggish demand for light and midsize jets and the threat from Brazil’s Embraer, Cessna has enlarged its midsize cabin cross-section and refreshed one of the lightest jets it builds. The new contenders were revealed last fall in the form of the 680A Latitude midsize and the M2 update of the CJ1+. They compete with, respectively, the Embraer Legacy 450 (slated for certification in late 2014 and service entry in early 2015) and the Phenom 100 (in service since 2009).

February 4, 2012 - 2:55am
(L to r) Doug Finn, Douglas County Board; Dave Minor, Superior Chamber of Commer

Kestrel Aircraft is abandoning plans to set up the headquarters and new production plant for its K-350 single-engine turboprop in Brunswick Landing, Maine. On January 16, the company announced a $118 million deal to locate in Richard I. Bong Airport in Superior, Wis., and begin construction in June. The agreement is being financed by a variety of grants, low-interest loans, and tax credits from the City of Superior, Douglas County and the state of Wisconsin.

Assembling Sources of Capital

February 4, 2012 - 1:08am

Business aviation will be well represented at the Singapore Airshow, despite the fact that just over a month later, most companies will be heading to Shanghai for NBAA’s relaunched Asian Business Aviation Conference & Exhibition (Abace). Airbus will give a show debut to its ACJ318 in Singapore, as will Gulfstream with its new G280. Another newcomer will be Ruag’s 228NG business/utility aircraft (a reworking of the Dornier twin turboprop).

February 4, 2012 - 12:50am

It’s another election year and time for a fresh round of craven attacks on general aviation by the uninformed elected.

While Congress can’t seem to pass an FAA budget on time, that hasn’t stopped a few members from attempting to micromanage FAA authority in their own districts, especially if it helps them get re-elected.

February 3, 2012 - 3:40am

The science-fiction pundits were wrong. The future of space travel doesn’t look like a Buck Rogers-style rocket poised to roar straight up into the twinkling heavens from a tinkerer’s backyard. What space travel will look like, according to a company called Stratolaunch Systems−which includes board member and backyard tinkerer Burt Rutan−is kind of unsurprising, more airplane-like, although no less fantastical.

February 3, 2012 - 3:25am

As the 2012 U.S. election campaign season begins ramping up, industry leaders are concerned about what they believe will be an unprecedented number of temporary flight restrictions (TFRs) as candidates spread out to press the flesh. Given the number of states up for grabs in what looks to be an extremely close and contentious presidential election, private aviation is bracing for the inevitable travel interruptions.

February 3, 2012 - 3:10am

With the Obama Administration doggedly promoting its proposal for a $100-per-flight user fee for millions of flights by turbine-powered general aviation aircraft, GA interests are organizing continued opposition.

February 3, 2012 - 2:55am

Back when David Bernstorf was involved in certifying new aircraft and developing supplemental type certificates for his employer, he joked about backing up a truck onto the parking lot of the FAA certification office and dumping the huge volumes of paper that accompany any certification program. Joking aside, all of the paper can amount to a truckload. Assembling that volume of paperwork, not to mention finding one report in the huge pile, was a frustrating endeavor.

February 3, 2012 - 2:10am
Source: Jetnet

By most accounts the fourth quarter of last year was active. While not atypical for that period, the activity was a good sign for the market that tradition seems to be intact, or at least reestablished after being pushed off course a few years ago. With the U.S. economy doing incrementally better, the hope is that this activity will spill into the first quarter and beyond. Many eyes now are cast upon Europe, where last month S&P lowered its credit ratings on nine nations.

 
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