Air Transport and Cargo » Air Transport and Cargo Engines

News and issues relating to air transport and cargo engines.

November 17, 2013 - 9:30am

CFM International announced on the eve of the show that it had closed the sale of Leap-1A engines to Pegasus Airlines for its Airbus A320neo/A321neo orders. The Snecma-GE joint venture also gave an update on Leap-1A testing. Separately, the French state has announced a divestiture of at least 3.6 percent of shares in Safran (Snecma’s parent company).

November 17, 2013 - 3:45am

International Aero Engines has launched its new Pure-V designation for V2500 engines maintained to IAE’s build standards, the company announced here in Dubai. A Pure-V-designated engine contains IAE-approved parts and repairs throughout the entire engine.

November 16, 2013 - 1:00am
Pratt & Whitney Canada is continuing with early development work for its planned New Generation Regional Turboprop.

Consensus is building among manufacturers and operators alike for a new 90-seat regional turboprop airliner, according to Pratt & Whitney Canada (P&WC), which is eager to press ahead with its plans for a New Generation Regional Turboprop (NGRT) engine.

November 15, 2013 - 4:00pm
Rolls-Royce is continuing to revamp the Trent 900 with a second enhanced-performance upgrade (EP2) that is expected to improve fuel consumption by another 0.8 percent. It is now running and destined to be the standard for production units as of early next year.

Rolls-Royce’s strategy of feeding technological developments from new programs back to established engines for upgrades or retrofit changes is creating a range of enhanced-performance (EP) packages being available to customers.

November 15, 2013 - 5:00am
Rolls-Royce Trent 1000 engines powered the Boeing 787-9’s first flight in September. The upgraded Trent 1000-TEN is under development and is to enter service on the 787-8 and -9 in 2016.

Rolls-Royce (R-R) has completed a 1,500-cycle test of its new Trent 1000-TEN engine and is well into the demonstration phase ahead of formal testing in early 2014, according to T1000 program chief engineer Gareth Jones. In mid-October, the initial demonstrator unit was being stripped down in R-R’s development department as the company prepared to assemble a second test engine.

November 15, 2013 - 3:00am
Testing of the Leap-1 powerplant will involve 60 engine builds over the next three years. Engine certification is slated for 2015 ahead of commercial service entry on the Airbus A320neo in 2016, according to CFM International.

With initial running of the new Leap-1 engine on schedule in September, CFM International (CFMI) has embarked on an “unprecedented” level of testing that should involve 20 developmental units by the end of next year and seven of the remaining eight planned examples before 2016 (when a final powerplant will take part in a short exercise–possibly a Leap-1C blade-out check).

November 15, 2013 - 2:30am
Snecma is preparing a high-speed-test to demonstrate the open rotor’s fuel burn advantage.

Snecma is about to carry out further tests on a one-fifth scale model of an open rotor engine, in a research and technology effort that epitomizes how laborious developing a new commercial engine concept can be.

November 4, 2013 - 11:40am

Boeing said it has completed aerodynamics, engine and weight audits that together have given it a clearer picture of the future operating performance of the new 737 Max. The manufacturer now says the re-engined narrowbody will burn 14 percent less fuel than today’s 737-800NG, one percent better than it previously estimated.

October 21, 2013 - 10:05am

Engine manufacturer CFM International reports that the Leap series of turbofans under development for the new Airbus A320neo, Boeing 737 Max and Comac C919 narrowbodies is performing as planned since full engine testing began last month. “I’m proud and really happy to tell you that the engine is running smoothly,” Chaker Chahrour, CFM executive vice president, told reporters in a teleconference on October 16. “This engine wants to run.”

September 16, 2013 - 10:40am

Snecma plans soon to start another phase of open-rotor engine testing using a one-fifth scale model, in a research and technology effort that epitomizes how laborious developing a new commercial engine concept can be. The concept, based on contra-rotating high-speed propellers, may not find itself in service before 2025. Nevertheless, trials aimed at cutting noise while retaining the huge efficiency advantage of the open rotor’s architecture are well under way.

 
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