FAA Proposes AD for Falcon Pressurization Problem

AINmxReports » September 23, 2009
September 23, 2009, 11:02 AM

The FAA has published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) for an Airworthiness Directive (AD) that would affect about 1,082 Falcons on the U.S. registry, namely the Dassault Falcon 10, Fan Jet Falcon, Mystere-Falcon 200, Mystere-Falcon 20-C5/-D5/-E5/-F5, Falcon 2000, Falcon 2000EX, Mystere-Falcon 50 and 900, and Falcon 900EX. The AD is based upon mandatory continuing airworthiness information issued by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) in the form of their Airworthiness Directive 2008-0072, dated April 18, 2008. It states that during maintenance on one aircraft it was discovered that the overpressure capsules were broken on both pressurization valves. Failure of the pressurization control regulating valve (overpressure capsule) will affect the aircraft’s overpressure protection and could result in a structural failure should it occur in combination with another pressurization system failure. Consequently, Dassault Aviation has developed a repetitive check of the outflow valve capsule. That check has already been introduced into the maintenance of components section of the relevant aircraft maintenance manuals (AMM). Accordingly, the EASA AD requires a repetitive check of the outflow valve overpressure capsule and it will also be introduced into the airworthiness limitations section of the respective AMMs. If implemented, the FAA AD will require repetitive inspections for overpressure tightness on both regulating valves and replacing the affected valve with a serviceable unit, if necessary. A spokesman for Dassault Falcon told AIN the company issued new maintenance procedures and service advisories in 2007 and 2008 to address the situation. “The proposed Airworthiness Directive is part of the normal process used to ensure that this situation is properly addressed,” he said. The FAA estimates that the proposed AD will take about one work-hour to complete. It is accepting comments on the NPRM until October 21.

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