GA Deliveries Down Again in 2010, Billings Increase

AINalerts » February 22, 2011
February 22, 2011, 10:15 AM

Last year saw the lowest number of turbine-powered aircraft deliveries since 2005, according to year-end statistics released this morning by the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA). The total of 763 bizjets handed over represented a more than 12-percent decrease from 2009 and a drop of nearly 42 percent from the industry high of 1,313 set in 2008, while the number of turboprops handed over saw a decline of approximately 18 percent over the previous year. Despite the reduced numbers, industry billings increased by 1.2 percent to $19.7 billion, based largely on the continuing strength of the large-cabin, long-range segment. Exports accounted for 62 percent of billings, up 11 percent over 2009. According to GAMA chairman and Dassault Falcon president and CEO John Rosanvallon, "78 percent of U.S. business jet purchases in 2010 were cash transactions [as opposed to financed], up by 13 percent over the figure for 2009. Finance for midsize, light and small jets remains limited." GAMA president Pete Bunce added, “For our companies that are building at the higher end of the spectrum of products, business is good because the part of the world that is buying these airplanes needs large-cabin, long-range capability." Based on the pattern of previous downturn recoveries, he said the traditional 18-month lag between the end of the recent economic disruption and the return of confidence for customers to resume orders would be ending around this time. “We saw what we hope was the bottoming out in 2010, and all our predictors are pretty strong for 2011 to be working our way back up,” he told AIN. "We look at 2011 with optimism and caution."Last year saw the lowest number of turbine- powered aircraft deliveries since 2005, according to year-end statistics released this morning by the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA). The total of 763 bizjets handed over represented a more than 12- percent decrease from 2009 and a drop of nearly 42 percent from below the industry high of 1,313 set in 2008, while the number of turboprops handed over saw a decline of approximately 18 percent over the previous year. Despite the reduced numbers, industry billings increased by 1.2 percent to $19.7 billion, based largely on the continuing strength of the large-cabin, long-range segment. “For our companies that are building at the higher end of the spectrum of products, business is good because the part of the world that is buying these airplanes needs large-cabin, long- range capability,” said GAMA president Pete Bunce. Based on the pattern of previous downturn recoveries, he noted said the traditional 18-month lag between the end of the recent economic disruption and the return of confidence for customers to resume orders would be ending around this time. “We saw what we hope was the bottoming out in 2010, and all our predictors are pretty strong for 2011 to be working our way back up,” he told AIN.

 

 

 

Share this...

Please Register

In order to leave comments you will now need to be a registered user. This change in policy is to protect our site from an increased number of spam comments. Additionally, in the near future you will be able to better manage your AIN subscriptions via this registration system. If you already have an account, click here to log in. Otherwise, click here to register.

 
X